Oral Pathogens and Dendritic Cell Subsets

  • Cutler, Christopher W (PI)
  • Cutler, Christopher W (PI)
  • CUTLER, CHRISTOPHER WILLIAM (PI)
  • CUTLER, CHRISTOPHER WILLIAM (PI)
  • CUTLER, CHRISTOPHER WILLIAM (PI)
  • CUTLER, CHRISTOPHER WILLIAM (PI)
  • CUTLER, CHRISTOPHER WILLIAM (PI)

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

DESCRIPTION (Adapted from the Investigator's Abstract): The Principal
Investigator has proposed a novel overall hypothesis and approach to
understanding the pathophysiology of adult periodontitis (AP), one of the most
common of diseases that afflict the US population. While mortality of the
dentition is the most familiar outcome of AP, its links with other more severe
diseases, including coronary artery disease, respiratory diseases and pre-term
labor cannot be ignored. These investigators have called attention to the many
intriguing parallels between AP and contact hypersensitivity (CHS). CHS is
among the most common of dermatoses that afflicts mankind and one of the most
intensively studied of in vivo immune responses. Both AP and CHS target the
host integument (gingiva or skin) and appear to involve the activation and
sensitization of similar subsets of antigen capture and presenting cells, the
dendritic cells. Dendritic cells have been termed "Nature's adjuvant," being
more efficient at antigen-presentation than macrophages or B cells and the only
antigen-presenting cells (APCs) than can stimulate naive T cells to
proliferate. This immunostimulatory capacity can also have detrimental effects
for the host, as typified by contact hypersensitivity (CHS) responses. Both AP
and CHS involve a predominantly destructive T cell response mediated by both
regulatory and effector T cells. These investigators have shown that
Porphyromonas gingivalis is a unique pathogen in this regard, able to infect,
sensitize, and activate dendritic cells in vitro and likely, in situ. Many
questions about the role of P. gingivalis-sensitized dendritic cells in AP,
however, remain unanswered. The present proposal will definitively establish,
using in situ, ex vivo and in vitro approaches, the role of dendritic cells in
adult periodontitis, particularly that induced by P. gingivalis. Moreover,
these studies will characterize the interactions of P. gingivalis with
dendritic cells and will further our knowledge of the pathophysiology of AP as
it relates to CHS. Future studies, outside the purview of this proposal, will
involve understanding the T cell response to P. gingivalis-activated dendritic
cells.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date2/1/018/31/16

Funding

  • National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research: $356,400.00
  • National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research: $222,879.00
  • National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research: $357,351.00
  • National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research: $14,034.00
  • National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research: $402,915.00
  • National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research: $371,250.00
  • National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research: $285,950.00
  • National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research: $265,875.00
  • National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research: $283,290.00
  • National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research: $285,950.00
  • National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research: $285,950.00
  • National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research: $285,950.00
  • National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research: $371,250.00
  • National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research: $388,717.00
  • National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research: $364,975.00
  • National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research: $374,359.00

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)
  • Dentistry(all)

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