A conjugate vaccine for the prevention of pediatric pneumococcal disease

Dennis Murray, Cynthia Jackson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The use of the pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV7 [Prevnar], Wyeth Lederle Vaccines), and the impact it is likely to have on pneumococcal disease are reviewed. Pneumococcal disease in infants and young children is a major health care burden, and the increase in antibiotic resistance among pneumococci has complicated disease management. The 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccines do not protect infants and children younger than 2 years of age. PCV7 is effective in this population and should dramatically reduce the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease and have an impact on the incidence of infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes present in the vaccine. Research has shown that pneumococcal conjugate vaccines reduce nasopharyngeal carriage of vaccine serotype S. pneumoniae, including antibiotic-resistant strains. Routine immunization is expected to substantially reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with invasive pneumococcal disease in children, and coupled with expected herd immunity and decreased antibiotic selective pressure, it should have a positive impact beyond the immunized population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)671-677
Number of pages7
JournalMilitary Medicine
Volume167
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 23 2002

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Conjugate Vaccines
Pediatrics
Pneumococcal Vaccines
Vaccines
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Herd Immunity
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Pneumococcal Infections
Incidence
Microbial Drug Resistance
Disease Management
Population
Immunization
Morbidity
Delivery of Health Care
Mortality
Research
Serogroup

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

A conjugate vaccine for the prevention of pediatric pneumococcal disease. / Murray, Dennis; Jackson, Cynthia.

In: Military Medicine, Vol. 167, No. 8, 23.08.2002, p. 671-677.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Murray, D & Jackson, C 2002, 'A conjugate vaccine for the prevention of pediatric pneumococcal disease', Military Medicine, vol. 167, no. 8, pp. 671-677.
Murray, Dennis ; Jackson, Cynthia. / A conjugate vaccine for the prevention of pediatric pneumococcal disease. In: Military Medicine. 2002 ; Vol. 167, No. 8. pp. 671-677.
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