A preliminary exploration of the moderating role of valued living in the relationships between racist experiences and anxious and depressive symptoms

Jessica R. Graham, Lindsey Michelle West, Lizabeth Roemer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study explores the relationship between frequency of racist experiences and anxious arousal, stress (general anxiety), and depressive symptoms in an African American sample. Fifty-seven Afriscan American undergraduate and graduate students responded to questionnaires assessing experiences of racism, valued living, and anxious arousal, stress (general anxiety), and depressive symptoms. Results indicated that valued living was significantly negatively correlated with anxious arousal, stress (general anxiety), and depressive symptoms. Additionally, valued living moderated the relationship between past year frequency of racist events and these symptoms. Specifically, the relationships between past year frequency of racist events and anxiety and depressive symptoms were significantly positive at low levels of valued living and not significant at high levels of valued living. Results from the current study provide preliminary evidence that engaging in actions consistent with what matters to the individual may buffer the negative emotional impact of racist experiences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)48-55
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Contextual Behavioral Science
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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anxiety
Anxiety
Arousal
Depression
experience
Racism
event
African Americans
college students
racism
African American
Buffers
students
questionnaires
buffers
graduate
Students
student
Depressive symptoms
questionnaire

Keywords

  • African American
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Racism
  • Values

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

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