A profile and prediction study of problem drinking among first-year medical students

Mary Ann Forney, William K. Ripley, Paul D. Forney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A study was conducted to determine to what extent first-year medical students are engaged in alcohol use and if specific sociocultural and self-reported behavior characteristics can be used to develop a profile and to predict potential problem drinkers. Four geographically distinct medical schools participated in the study, with a total of 341 students completing a questionnaire regarding current alcohol use and other risk-taking behaviors. Chi-square analyses, analyses of variance, and a discriminant analysis indicated that there is a high occurrence of frequent and heavy drinking among first-year medical students. Potential problem drinkers appear to be White males whose fathers are heavy drinkers. They seem prone to a nonpassive life-style and attend church infrequently. Prevention/intervention programs in medical school can utilize these results to identify high-risk individuals early in their medical career and target them for counseling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)767-779
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of the Addictions
Volume23
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 23 1988

Fingerprint

first-year student
Medical Schools
Medical Students
Drinking
medical student
alcohol
Alcohols
life style
discriminant analysis
Discriminant Analysis
Risk-Taking
Fathers
school
Life Style
Counseling
counseling
Analysis of Variance
father
church
career

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

A profile and prediction study of problem drinking among first-year medical students. / Forney, Mary Ann; Ripley, William K.; Forney, Paul D.

In: International Journal of the Addictions, Vol. 23, No. 7, 23.07.1988, p. 767-779.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Forney, Mary Ann ; Ripley, William K. ; Forney, Paul D. / A profile and prediction study of problem drinking among first-year medical students. In: International Journal of the Addictions. 1988 ; Vol. 23, No. 7. pp. 767-779.
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