A randomized controlled trial of stress reduction in African Americans treated for hypertension for over one year

Robert H. Schneider, Charles N. Alexander, Frank Staggers, David W. Orme-Johnson, Maxwell Rainforth, John W. Salerno, William Sheppard, Amparo Castillo-Richmond, Vernon A Barnes, Sanford I. Nidich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Psychosocial stress has been implicated in the disproportionately higher rates of hypertension among African Americans. This randomized controlled trial compared the effects of two stress reduction techniques and a health education control program on hypertension during a period of 1 year in African-American men and women (N = 150, mean age 49 ± 10 years, mean blood pressure (BP) = 142/95 mm Hg) at an urban community health center. Interventions included 20 min twice a day of Transcendental Meditation (TM) or progressive muscle relaxation (PMR), or participation in conventional health education (HE) classes. All subjects continued usual medical care. Outcomes assessed were systolic BP and diastolic BP at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after treatment, analyzed by repeated measures ANCOVA. The TM group showed decreases in systolic BP/diastolic BP of -3.1/-5.7 mm Hg compared to -0.5/-2.9 mm Hg for PMR or HE, (P = .12 to .17 for systolic BP, P = .01 for diastolic BP). In addition the TM group demonstrated reduced use of antihypertensive medication relative to increases for PMR (P = .001) and HE (P = .09) groups. Group analysis by gender showed that women practicing TM had decreased BP (-7.3/-6.9 mm Hg) significantly more than women practicing PMR (0.7/-2.7 mm Hg) or HE (-.07/-3.0 mm Hg) (P .01 to .03). The change in men praticing TM (0.2 /-4.7 mm Hg) was greater than men practicing HE (-0.9/-2.0 mm Hg) for diastolic BP only (P = .09,) and not different from PMR men (-2.0/-3.1). A selected stress reduction approach, the Transcendental Meditation program, may be useful as an adjunct in the long-term treatment of hypertension in African Americans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)88-98
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Hypertension
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

Fingerprint

African Americans
Randomized Controlled Trials
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Meditation
Autogenic Training
Health Education
Urban Health
Men's Health
Community Health Centers
Antihypertensive Agents

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Hypertension
  • clinical trial
  • lifestyle modification
  • progressive muscle relaxation
  • stress reduction
  • transcendental meditation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Schneider, R. H., Alexander, C. N., Staggers, F., Orme-Johnson, D. W., Rainforth, M., Salerno, J. W., ... Nidich, S. I. (2005). A randomized controlled trial of stress reduction in African Americans treated for hypertension for over one year. American Journal of Hypertension, 18(1), 88-98. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjhyper.2004.08.027

A randomized controlled trial of stress reduction in African Americans treated for hypertension for over one year. / Schneider, Robert H.; Alexander, Charles N.; Staggers, Frank; Orme-Johnson, David W.; Rainforth, Maxwell; Salerno, John W.; Sheppard, William; Castillo-Richmond, Amparo; Barnes, Vernon A; Nidich, Sanford I.

In: American Journal of Hypertension, Vol. 18, No. 1, 01.01.2005, p. 88-98.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schneider, RH, Alexander, CN, Staggers, F, Orme-Johnson, DW, Rainforth, M, Salerno, JW, Sheppard, W, Castillo-Richmond, A, Barnes, VA & Nidich, SI 2005, 'A randomized controlled trial of stress reduction in African Americans treated for hypertension for over one year', American Journal of Hypertension, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 88-98. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjhyper.2004.08.027
Schneider, Robert H. ; Alexander, Charles N. ; Staggers, Frank ; Orme-Johnson, David W. ; Rainforth, Maxwell ; Salerno, John W. ; Sheppard, William ; Castillo-Richmond, Amparo ; Barnes, Vernon A ; Nidich, Sanford I. / A randomized controlled trial of stress reduction in African Americans treated for hypertension for over one year. In: American Journal of Hypertension. 2005 ; Vol. 18, No. 1. pp. 88-98.
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