A randomized controlled trial of telephone-delivered cognitive-behavioral therapy for late-life anxiety disorders

Gretchen A. Brenes, Michael E. Miller, Jeff D. Williamson, William Vaughn McCall, Mark Knudson, Melinda A. Stanley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Older adults face a number of barriers to receiving psychotherapy, such as a lack of transportation and access to providers. One way to overcome such barriers is to provide treatment by telephone. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy delivered by telephone (CBT-T) to older adults diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Participants' homes. PARTICIPANTS: Sixty participants age 60 and older with a diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, or anxiety disorder not otherwise specified. INTERVENTION: CBT-T versus information-only comparison. MEASUREMENTS: Coprimary outcomes included worry (Penn State Worry Questionnaire) and general anxiety (State Trait Anxiety Inventory). Secondary outcomes included clinician-rated anxiety (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale), anxiety sensitivity (Anxiety Sensitivity Index), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory), quality of life (SF-36), and sleep (Insomnia Severity Index). Assessments were completed prior to randomization, immediately upon completion of treatment, and 6 months after completing treatment. RESULTS: CBT-T was superior to information-only in reducing general anxiety (ES = 0.71), worry (ES = 0.61), anxiety sensitivity (ES = 0.85), and insomnia (ES = 0.82) at the posttreatment assessment; however, only the reductions in worry were maintained by the 6-month follow-up assessment (ES = 0.80). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that CBT-T may be efficacious in reducing anxiety and worry in older adults, but additional sessions may be needed to maintain these effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)707-716
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume20
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

Cognitive Therapy
Anxiety Disorders
Telephone
Anxiety
Randomized Controlled Trials
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Depression
Equipment and Supplies
Panic Disorder
Random Allocation
Psychotherapy
Sleep
Therapeutics
Quality of Life

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • cognitive-behavioral therapy
  • elderly
  • generalized anxiety disorder
  • panic disorder
  • telephone-delivered psychotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

A randomized controlled trial of telephone-delivered cognitive-behavioral therapy for late-life anxiety disorders. / Brenes, Gretchen A.; Miller, Michael E.; Williamson, Jeff D.; McCall, William Vaughn; Knudson, Mark; Stanley, Melinda A.

In: American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Vol. 20, No. 8, 01.01.2012, p. 707-716.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brenes, Gretchen A. ; Miller, Michael E. ; Williamson, Jeff D. ; McCall, William Vaughn ; Knudson, Mark ; Stanley, Melinda A. / A randomized controlled trial of telephone-delivered cognitive-behavioral therapy for late-life anxiety disorders. In: American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2012 ; Vol. 20, No. 8. pp. 707-716.
@article{44ce9498a27043e5963ae2694122827e,
title = "A randomized controlled trial of telephone-delivered cognitive-behavioral therapy for late-life anxiety disorders",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: Older adults face a number of barriers to receiving psychotherapy, such as a lack of transportation and access to providers. One way to overcome such barriers is to provide treatment by telephone. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy delivered by telephone (CBT-T) to older adults diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Participants' homes. PARTICIPANTS: Sixty participants age 60 and older with a diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, or anxiety disorder not otherwise specified. INTERVENTION: CBT-T versus information-only comparison. MEASUREMENTS: Coprimary outcomes included worry (Penn State Worry Questionnaire) and general anxiety (State Trait Anxiety Inventory). Secondary outcomes included clinician-rated anxiety (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale), anxiety sensitivity (Anxiety Sensitivity Index), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory), quality of life (SF-36), and sleep (Insomnia Severity Index). Assessments were completed prior to randomization, immediately upon completion of treatment, and 6 months after completing treatment. RESULTS: CBT-T was superior to information-only in reducing general anxiety (ES = 0.71), worry (ES = 0.61), anxiety sensitivity (ES = 0.85), and insomnia (ES = 0.82) at the posttreatment assessment; however, only the reductions in worry were maintained by the 6-month follow-up assessment (ES = 0.80). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that CBT-T may be efficacious in reducing anxiety and worry in older adults, but additional sessions may be needed to maintain these effects.",
keywords = "Anxiety, cognitive-behavioral therapy, elderly, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, telephone-delivered psychotherapy",
author = "Brenes, {Gretchen A.} and Miller, {Michael E.} and Williamson, {Jeff D.} and McCall, {William Vaughn} and Mark Knudson and Stanley, {Melinda A.}",
year = "2012",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/JGP.0b013e31822ccd3e",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "707--716",
journal = "American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry",
issn = "1064-7481",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A randomized controlled trial of telephone-delivered cognitive-behavioral therapy for late-life anxiety disorders

AU - Brenes, Gretchen A.

AU - Miller, Michael E.

AU - Williamson, Jeff D.

AU - McCall, William Vaughn

AU - Knudson, Mark

AU - Stanley, Melinda A.

PY - 2012/1/1

Y1 - 2012/1/1

N2 - OBJECTIVES: Older adults face a number of barriers to receiving psychotherapy, such as a lack of transportation and access to providers. One way to overcome such barriers is to provide treatment by telephone. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy delivered by telephone (CBT-T) to older adults diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Participants' homes. PARTICIPANTS: Sixty participants age 60 and older with a diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, or anxiety disorder not otherwise specified. INTERVENTION: CBT-T versus information-only comparison. MEASUREMENTS: Coprimary outcomes included worry (Penn State Worry Questionnaire) and general anxiety (State Trait Anxiety Inventory). Secondary outcomes included clinician-rated anxiety (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale), anxiety sensitivity (Anxiety Sensitivity Index), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory), quality of life (SF-36), and sleep (Insomnia Severity Index). Assessments were completed prior to randomization, immediately upon completion of treatment, and 6 months after completing treatment. RESULTS: CBT-T was superior to information-only in reducing general anxiety (ES = 0.71), worry (ES = 0.61), anxiety sensitivity (ES = 0.85), and insomnia (ES = 0.82) at the posttreatment assessment; however, only the reductions in worry were maintained by the 6-month follow-up assessment (ES = 0.80). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that CBT-T may be efficacious in reducing anxiety and worry in older adults, but additional sessions may be needed to maintain these effects.

AB - OBJECTIVES: Older adults face a number of barriers to receiving psychotherapy, such as a lack of transportation and access to providers. One way to overcome such barriers is to provide treatment by telephone. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy delivered by telephone (CBT-T) to older adults diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Participants' homes. PARTICIPANTS: Sixty participants age 60 and older with a diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, or anxiety disorder not otherwise specified. INTERVENTION: CBT-T versus information-only comparison. MEASUREMENTS: Coprimary outcomes included worry (Penn State Worry Questionnaire) and general anxiety (State Trait Anxiety Inventory). Secondary outcomes included clinician-rated anxiety (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale), anxiety sensitivity (Anxiety Sensitivity Index), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory), quality of life (SF-36), and sleep (Insomnia Severity Index). Assessments were completed prior to randomization, immediately upon completion of treatment, and 6 months after completing treatment. RESULTS: CBT-T was superior to information-only in reducing general anxiety (ES = 0.71), worry (ES = 0.61), anxiety sensitivity (ES = 0.85), and insomnia (ES = 0.82) at the posttreatment assessment; however, only the reductions in worry were maintained by the 6-month follow-up assessment (ES = 0.80). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that CBT-T may be efficacious in reducing anxiety and worry in older adults, but additional sessions may be needed to maintain these effects.

KW - Anxiety

KW - cognitive-behavioral therapy

KW - elderly

KW - generalized anxiety disorder

KW - panic disorder

KW - telephone-delivered psychotherapy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84864241378&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84864241378&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/JGP.0b013e31822ccd3e

DO - 10.1097/JGP.0b013e31822ccd3e

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 707

EP - 716

JO - American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

JF - American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

SN - 1064-7481

IS - 8

ER -