A retrospective analysis of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in Trinidad.

K. P. Williams, Michele Anne Monteil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A retrospective analysis of culture-positive cases of S pneumoniae from normally sterile body fluids is reported. Over 40% of patients were 5 years old or less while 28% of patients were 50 years old or more. Meningitis (44%) was the commonest clinical presentation followed closely by pneumonia (31%). The commonest predisposing disorder was human immunodeficiency virus infection though there were no identifiable risk factors in the majority of patients. Mortality from invasive pneumococcal disease was significantly higher in elderly patients compared with other age groups (p = 0.0003). In this study, all S pneumoniae isolates, for which there were antibiotic sensitivity data, were penicillin and/or amoxycillin sensitive.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)61-64
Number of pages4
JournalThe West Indian medical journal
Volume49
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Trinidad and Tobago
Pneumococcal Infections
Pneumonia
Amoxicillin
Body Fluids
Virus Diseases
Meningitis
Penicillins
Age Groups
HIV
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A retrospective analysis of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in Trinidad. / Williams, K. P.; Monteil, Michele Anne.

In: The West Indian medical journal, Vol. 49, No. 1, 01.01.2000, p. 61-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Williams, K. P. ; Monteil, Michele Anne. / A retrospective analysis of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in Trinidad. In: The West Indian medical journal. 2000 ; Vol. 49, No. 1. pp. 61-64.
@article{a4ede92a93d94d9db7099adc90b37825,
title = "A retrospective analysis of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in Trinidad.",
abstract = "A retrospective analysis of culture-positive cases of S pneumoniae from normally sterile body fluids is reported. Over 40{\%} of patients were 5 years old or less while 28{\%} of patients were 50 years old or more. Meningitis (44{\%}) was the commonest clinical presentation followed closely by pneumonia (31{\%}). The commonest predisposing disorder was human immunodeficiency virus infection though there were no identifiable risk factors in the majority of patients. Mortality from invasive pneumococcal disease was significantly higher in elderly patients compared with other age groups (p = 0.0003). In this study, all S pneumoniae isolates, for which there were antibiotic sensitivity data, were penicillin and/or amoxycillin sensitive.",
author = "Williams, {K. P.} and Monteil, {Michele Anne}",
year = "2000",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "49",
pages = "61--64",
journal = "West Indian Medical Journal",
issn = "0043-3144",
publisher = "University of the West Indies",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A retrospective analysis of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in Trinidad.

AU - Williams, K. P.

AU - Monteil, Michele Anne

PY - 2000/1/1

Y1 - 2000/1/1

N2 - A retrospective analysis of culture-positive cases of S pneumoniae from normally sterile body fluids is reported. Over 40% of patients were 5 years old or less while 28% of patients were 50 years old or more. Meningitis (44%) was the commonest clinical presentation followed closely by pneumonia (31%). The commonest predisposing disorder was human immunodeficiency virus infection though there were no identifiable risk factors in the majority of patients. Mortality from invasive pneumococcal disease was significantly higher in elderly patients compared with other age groups (p = 0.0003). In this study, all S pneumoniae isolates, for which there were antibiotic sensitivity data, were penicillin and/or amoxycillin sensitive.

AB - A retrospective analysis of culture-positive cases of S pneumoniae from normally sterile body fluids is reported. Over 40% of patients were 5 years old or less while 28% of patients were 50 years old or more. Meningitis (44%) was the commonest clinical presentation followed closely by pneumonia (31%). The commonest predisposing disorder was human immunodeficiency virus infection though there were no identifiable risk factors in the majority of patients. Mortality from invasive pneumococcal disease was significantly higher in elderly patients compared with other age groups (p = 0.0003). In this study, all S pneumoniae isolates, for which there were antibiotic sensitivity data, were penicillin and/or amoxycillin sensitive.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034152328&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034152328&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 49

SP - 61

EP - 64

JO - West Indian Medical Journal

JF - West Indian Medical Journal

SN - 0043-3144

IS - 1

ER -