A technique of quantitatively monitoring both respiratory and nonrespiratory motion in patients using external body markers

Jian Yue Jin, Munther Ajlouni, Samuel Ryu, Qing Chen, Shidong Li, Benjamin Movsas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to develop a technique that could quantitatively monitor the nonrespiratory motion of a patient during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Multiple infrared external markers were placed on the patient's chest and abdominal surface to obtain patient motion signals. These motion signals contained both respiratory and nonrespiratory motion information. The respiratory motion usually has much larger amplitude on the abdominal surface than on the chest surface. Assuming that the nonrespiratory motion is a rigid body translation, we have developed a computer algorithm to derive both the respiratory and nonrespiratory motion signals instantly from two sets of motion signals. In first-order approximation, the respiratory motion was represented by the motion signal on the abdominal surface, and the nonrespiratory motion was represented by the motion signal on the chest surface subtracting its respiratory component. The algorithm was retrospectively tested on 24 patients whose motion signals were recorded during a gated-CT simulation procedure. The result showed that the respiratory noise in the nonrespiratory motion signal was reduced to less than 1 mm for almost all patients, demonstrating that the technique was able to detect nonrespiratory motion with a sensitivity of about 1 mm. It also showed that 50% of the patients had ≥2 mm, and 2 patients had ≥3 mm slow drift during the 15- 25 min simulation procedure, suggesting that nonrespiratory motion could exist during prolonged treatment. This technique can potentially be used to control the nonrespiratory motion during SBRT. However, further validation is required for its clinical use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2875-2881
Number of pages7
JournalMedical Physics
Volume34
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

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Keywords

  • Infrared markers
  • Motion monitoring
  • Nonrespiratory motion
  • Respiratory motion
  • Stereotactic body radiotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

A technique of quantitatively monitoring both respiratory and nonrespiratory motion in patients using external body markers. / Jin, Jian Yue; Ajlouni, Munther; Ryu, Samuel; Chen, Qing; Li, Shidong; Movsas, Benjamin.

In: Medical Physics, Vol. 34, No. 7, 01.01.2007, p. 2875-2881.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jin, Jian Yue ; Ajlouni, Munther ; Ryu, Samuel ; Chen, Qing ; Li, Shidong ; Movsas, Benjamin. / A technique of quantitatively monitoring both respiratory and nonrespiratory motion in patients using external body markers. In: Medical Physics. 2007 ; Vol. 34, No. 7. pp. 2875-2881.
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