A three-year prospective study of repeat head computed tomography in patients with traumatic brain injury

Bellal Joseph, Hassan Aziz, Viraj Pandit, Narong Kulvatunyou, Ammar Hashmi, Andrew Tang, Moutamn Sadoun, Terence OKeeffe, Gary Vercruysse, Donald J. Green, Randall S. Friese, Peter Rhee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background A definitive consensus on the standardization of practice of a routine repeat head CT (RHCT) scan in patients with traumatic intracranial hemorrhage is lacking. We hypothesized that in examinable patients without neurologic deterioration, RHCT scan does not lead to neurosurgical intervention (craniotomy/craniectomy). Study Design This was a 3-year prospective cohort analysis of patients aged 18 years and older, without antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy, presenting to our level 1 trauma center with intracranial hemorrhage on initial head CT and a follow-up RHCT. Neurosurgical intervention was defined by craniotomy/craniectomy. Neurologic deterioration was defined as altered mental status, focal neurologic deficits, and/or pupillary changes. Results A total of 1,129 patients were included. Routine RHCT was performed in 1,099 patients. The progression rate was 19.7% (216 of 1,099), with subsequent neurosurgical intervention in 4 patients. Four patients had an abnormal neurologic examination, with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of ≤8 requiring intubation. Thirty patients had an RHCT secondary to neurologic deterioration; 53% (16 of 30) had progression on RHCT, of which 75% (12 of 16) required neurosurgical intervention. There was an association between deterioration in neurologic examination and need for neurosurgical intervention (odds ratio 3.98; 95% CI 1.7 to 9.1). The negative predictive value of a deteriorating neurologic examination in predicting the need for neurosurgical intervention was 100% in patients with GCS > 8. Conclusions Routine repeat head CT scan is not warranted in patients with normal neurologic examination. Routine repeat head CT scan does not supplement the need for neurologic examination for determining management in patients with traumatic brain injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)45-51
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American College of Surgeons
Volume219
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Head
Tomography
Prospective Studies
Neurologic Examination
Nervous System
Glasgow Coma Scale
Craniotomy
Traumatic Intracranial Hemorrhage
Traumatic Brain Injury
Intracranial Hemorrhages
Trauma Centers
Neurologic Manifestations
Intubation
Cohort Studies
Odds Ratio

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

A three-year prospective study of repeat head computed tomography in patients with traumatic brain injury. / Joseph, Bellal; Aziz, Hassan; Pandit, Viraj; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Hashmi, Ammar; Tang, Andrew; Sadoun, Moutamn; OKeeffe, Terence; Vercruysse, Gary; Green, Donald J.; Friese, Randall S.; Rhee, Peter.

In: Journal of the American College of Surgeons, Vol. 219, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 45-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Joseph, B, Aziz, H, Pandit, V, Kulvatunyou, N, Hashmi, A, Tang, A, Sadoun, M, OKeeffe, T, Vercruysse, G, Green, DJ, Friese, RS & Rhee, P 2014, 'A three-year prospective study of repeat head computed tomography in patients with traumatic brain injury', Journal of the American College of Surgeons, vol. 219, no. 1, pp. 45-51. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2013.12.062
Joseph, Bellal ; Aziz, Hassan ; Pandit, Viraj ; Kulvatunyou, Narong ; Hashmi, Ammar ; Tang, Andrew ; Sadoun, Moutamn ; OKeeffe, Terence ; Vercruysse, Gary ; Green, Donald J. ; Friese, Randall S. ; Rhee, Peter. / A three-year prospective study of repeat head computed tomography in patients with traumatic brain injury. In: Journal of the American College of Surgeons. 2014 ; Vol. 219, No. 1. pp. 45-51.
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abstract = "Background A definitive consensus on the standardization of practice of a routine repeat head CT (RHCT) scan in patients with traumatic intracranial hemorrhage is lacking. We hypothesized that in examinable patients without neurologic deterioration, RHCT scan does not lead to neurosurgical intervention (craniotomy/craniectomy). Study Design This was a 3-year prospective cohort analysis of patients aged 18 years and older, without antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy, presenting to our level 1 trauma center with intracranial hemorrhage on initial head CT and a follow-up RHCT. Neurosurgical intervention was defined by craniotomy/craniectomy. Neurologic deterioration was defined as altered mental status, focal neurologic deficits, and/or pupillary changes. Results A total of 1,129 patients were included. Routine RHCT was performed in 1,099 patients. The progression rate was 19.7{\%} (216 of 1,099), with subsequent neurosurgical intervention in 4 patients. Four patients had an abnormal neurologic examination, with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of ≤8 requiring intubation. Thirty patients had an RHCT secondary to neurologic deterioration; 53{\%} (16 of 30) had progression on RHCT, of which 75{\%} (12 of 16) required neurosurgical intervention. There was an association between deterioration in neurologic examination and need for neurosurgical intervention (odds ratio 3.98; 95{\%} CI 1.7 to 9.1). The negative predictive value of a deteriorating neurologic examination in predicting the need for neurosurgical intervention was 100{\%} in patients with GCS > 8. Conclusions Routine repeat head CT scan is not warranted in patients with normal neurologic examination. Routine repeat head CT scan does not supplement the need for neurologic examination for determining management in patients with traumatic brain injury.",
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AU - Aziz, Hassan

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AU - Hashmi, Ammar

AU - Tang, Andrew

AU - Sadoun, Moutamn

AU - OKeeffe, Terence

AU - Vercruysse, Gary

AU - Green, Donald J.

AU - Friese, Randall S.

AU - Rhee, Peter

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N2 - Background A definitive consensus on the standardization of practice of a routine repeat head CT (RHCT) scan in patients with traumatic intracranial hemorrhage is lacking. We hypothesized that in examinable patients without neurologic deterioration, RHCT scan does not lead to neurosurgical intervention (craniotomy/craniectomy). Study Design This was a 3-year prospective cohort analysis of patients aged 18 years and older, without antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy, presenting to our level 1 trauma center with intracranial hemorrhage on initial head CT and a follow-up RHCT. Neurosurgical intervention was defined by craniotomy/craniectomy. Neurologic deterioration was defined as altered mental status, focal neurologic deficits, and/or pupillary changes. Results A total of 1,129 patients were included. Routine RHCT was performed in 1,099 patients. The progression rate was 19.7% (216 of 1,099), with subsequent neurosurgical intervention in 4 patients. Four patients had an abnormal neurologic examination, with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of ≤8 requiring intubation. Thirty patients had an RHCT secondary to neurologic deterioration; 53% (16 of 30) had progression on RHCT, of which 75% (12 of 16) required neurosurgical intervention. There was an association between deterioration in neurologic examination and need for neurosurgical intervention (odds ratio 3.98; 95% CI 1.7 to 9.1). The negative predictive value of a deteriorating neurologic examination in predicting the need for neurosurgical intervention was 100% in patients with GCS > 8. Conclusions Routine repeat head CT scan is not warranted in patients with normal neurologic examination. Routine repeat head CT scan does not supplement the need for neurologic examination for determining management in patients with traumatic brain injury.

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