A young adult Jehovah's Witness with severe anemia

Nnenna Ukachi Badamosi, Wynne Morrison, Samantha VanHorn, Revathy Sundaram, John D. Lantos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two of the most ethically complex situations in pediatrics are those involving families whose religious beliefs preclude the provision of life-sustaining treatment and those involving young adults who have reached the age of legal majority and who face decisions about lifesustaining treatment. This month's "Ethics Rounds" presents a case in which these 2 complexities overlapped. An 18-year-old Jehovah's Witness with sickle cell disease has life-threatening anemia. She is going into heart failure. Her doctors urgently recommend blood transfusions. The young woman and her family adamantly refuse. Should the doctors let her die? Is there any alternative?.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)547-551
Number of pages5
JournalPediatrics
Volume132
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

Fingerprint

Jehovah's Witnesses
Anemia
Young Adult
Religion
Sickle Cell Anemia
Ethics
Blood Transfusion
Heart Failure
Pediatrics
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Adolescent patients
  • Age of consent
  • Alternate therapies
  • Blood transfusion
  • Clinical issues
  • Ethical issues
  • Jehovah's Witness
  • Sickle cell anemia
  • Sickle cell disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Badamosi, N. U., Morrison, W., VanHorn, S., Sundaram, R., & Lantos, J. D. (2013). A young adult Jehovah's Witness with severe anemia. Pediatrics, 132(3), 547-551. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2013-0503

A young adult Jehovah's Witness with severe anemia. / Badamosi, Nnenna Ukachi; Morrison, Wynne; VanHorn, Samantha; Sundaram, Revathy; Lantos, John D.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 132, No. 3, 01.09.2013, p. 547-551.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Badamosi, NU, Morrison, W, VanHorn, S, Sundaram, R & Lantos, JD 2013, 'A young adult Jehovah's Witness with severe anemia', Pediatrics, vol. 132, no. 3, pp. 547-551. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2013-0503
Badamosi NU, Morrison W, VanHorn S, Sundaram R, Lantos JD. A young adult Jehovah's Witness with severe anemia. Pediatrics. 2013 Sep 1;132(3):547-551. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2013-0503
Badamosi, Nnenna Ukachi ; Morrison, Wynne ; VanHorn, Samantha ; Sundaram, Revathy ; Lantos, John D. / A young adult Jehovah's Witness with severe anemia. In: Pediatrics. 2013 ; Vol. 132, No. 3. pp. 547-551.
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