Aerobic exercise and snoring in overweight children: A randomized controlled trial

Catherine Lucy Davis, Joseph Tkacz, Mathew Gregoski, Colleen A. Boyle, Gordana Lovrekovic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether regular aerobic exercise improves symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing in overweight children, as has been shown in adults. Research Methods and Procedures: Healthy but overweight (BMI ≥85th percentile) 7- to 11-year-old children were recruited from public schools for a randomized controlled trial of exercise effects on diabetes risk. One hundred children (53% black, 41% male) were randomly assigned to a control group (n = 27), a low-dose exercise group (n = 36), or a high-dose exercise group (n = 37). Exercise groups underwent a 13 ± 1.5 week after-school program that provided 20 or 40 minutes per day of aerobic exercise (average heart rate = 164 beats per minute). Group changes were compared on BMI z-score and four Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire scales: Snoring, Sleepiness, Behavior, and a summary scale, Sleep-Related Breathing Disorders. Analyses were adjusted for age. Results: Both the high-dose and low-dose exercise groups improved more than the control group on the Snoring scale. The high-dose exercise group improved more than the low-dose exercise and control groups on the summary scale. No group differences were found for changes on Sleepiness, Behavior, or BMI z-score. At baseline, 25% screened positive for sleep-disordered breathing; half improved to a negative screen after intervention. Discussion: Regular vigorous exercise can improve snoring, a symptom of sleep-disordered breathing, in overweight children. Aerobic exercise programs may be valuable for prevention and treatment of sleep-disordered breathing in overweight children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1985-1991
Number of pages7
JournalObesity
Volume14
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006

Fingerprint

Snoring
Randomized Controlled Trials
Exercise
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Control Groups
Sleep
Respiration
Heart Rate
Pediatrics

Keywords

  • Race
  • Sex
  • Sleep-disordered breathing
  • Symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Aerobic exercise and snoring in overweight children : A randomized controlled trial. / Davis, Catherine Lucy; Tkacz, Joseph; Gregoski, Mathew; Boyle, Colleen A.; Lovrekovic, Gordana.

In: Obesity, Vol. 14, No. 11, 01.01.2006, p. 1985-1991.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Davis, CL, Tkacz, J, Gregoski, M, Boyle, CA & Lovrekovic, G 2006, 'Aerobic exercise and snoring in overweight children: A randomized controlled trial', Obesity, vol. 14, no. 11, pp. 1985-1991. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2006.232
Davis, Catherine Lucy ; Tkacz, Joseph ; Gregoski, Mathew ; Boyle, Colleen A. ; Lovrekovic, Gordana. / Aerobic exercise and snoring in overweight children : A randomized controlled trial. In: Obesity. 2006 ; Vol. 14, No. 11. pp. 1985-1991.
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