African American ethnicity is not associated with development of Barrett's oesophagus after erosive oesophagitis

Ahmad Alkaddour, Camille McGaw, Rama Hritani, Carlos Palacio, Rahman Nakshabendi, Juan Carlos Munoz, Kenneth J Vega

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Barrett's oesophagus is the primary risk factor for oesophageal adenocarcinoma; erosive oesophagitis is considered an intermediate step with Barrett's oesophagus development potential upon healing. Barrett's oesophagus occurs in 9-19% following erosive oesophagitis but minimal data exists in African Americans. The study aim was to determine if ethnicity is associated with Barrett's oesophagus formation following erosive oesophagitis. Methods: Retrospective review of endoscopies from September 2007 to December 2012 was performed. Inclusion criteria were erosive oesophagitis on index endoscopy, repeat endoscopy ≥6 weeks later and non-Hispanic white or African American ethnicity. Barrett's oesophagus frequency following erosive oesophagitis by ethnicity was compared. Results: A total of 14,303 patients underwent endoscopy during the study period; 1636 had erosive oesophagitis. Repeat endoscopy was performed on 125 non-Hispanic white or African American patients ≥6 weeks from the index procedure. Barrett's oesophagus occurred in 8% of non-Hispanic whites while no African American developed it on repeat endoscopy following erosive oesophagitis (. p=. 0.029). No significant difference was seen between ethnic groups in any clinical parameter assessed. Conclusions: African American ethnicity appears to result in decreased Barrett's oesophagus formation following erosive oesophagitis. Further investigation to demonstrate factors resulting in decreased Barrett's oesophagus formation among African Americans should be performed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)853-856
Number of pages4
JournalDigestive and Liver Disease
Volume47
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

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Barrett Esophagus
Esophagitis
African Americans
Endoscopy
Ethnic Groups
Adenocarcinoma

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Barrett's oesophagus
  • Erosive oesophagitis
  • Ethnicity
  • GERD

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

African American ethnicity is not associated with development of Barrett's oesophagus after erosive oesophagitis. / Alkaddour, Ahmad; McGaw, Camille; Hritani, Rama; Palacio, Carlos; Nakshabendi, Rahman; Munoz, Juan Carlos; Vega, Kenneth J.

In: Digestive and Liver Disease, Vol. 47, No. 10, 01.10.2015, p. 853-856.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alkaddour, Ahmad ; McGaw, Camille ; Hritani, Rama ; Palacio, Carlos ; Nakshabendi, Rahman ; Munoz, Juan Carlos ; Vega, Kenneth J. / African American ethnicity is not associated with development of Barrett's oesophagus after erosive oesophagitis. In: Digestive and Liver Disease. 2015 ; Vol. 47, No. 10. pp. 853-856.
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abstract = "Background: Barrett's oesophagus is the primary risk factor for oesophageal adenocarcinoma; erosive oesophagitis is considered an intermediate step with Barrett's oesophagus development potential upon healing. Barrett's oesophagus occurs in 9-19{\%} following erosive oesophagitis but minimal data exists in African Americans. The study aim was to determine if ethnicity is associated with Barrett's oesophagus formation following erosive oesophagitis. Methods: Retrospective review of endoscopies from September 2007 to December 2012 was performed. Inclusion criteria were erosive oesophagitis on index endoscopy, repeat endoscopy ≥6 weeks later and non-Hispanic white or African American ethnicity. Barrett's oesophagus frequency following erosive oesophagitis by ethnicity was compared. Results: A total of 14,303 patients underwent endoscopy during the study period; 1636 had erosive oesophagitis. Repeat endoscopy was performed on 125 non-Hispanic white or African American patients ≥6 weeks from the index procedure. Barrett's oesophagus occurred in 8{\%} of non-Hispanic whites while no African American developed it on repeat endoscopy following erosive oesophagitis (. p=. 0.029). No significant difference was seen between ethnic groups in any clinical parameter assessed. Conclusions: African American ethnicity appears to result in decreased Barrett's oesophagus formation following erosive oesophagitis. Further investigation to demonstrate factors resulting in decreased Barrett's oesophagus formation among African Americans should be performed.",
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AU - Palacio, Carlos

AU - Nakshabendi, Rahman

AU - Munoz, Juan Carlos

AU - Vega, Kenneth J

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AB - Background: Barrett's oesophagus is the primary risk factor for oesophageal adenocarcinoma; erosive oesophagitis is considered an intermediate step with Barrett's oesophagus development potential upon healing. Barrett's oesophagus occurs in 9-19% following erosive oesophagitis but minimal data exists in African Americans. The study aim was to determine if ethnicity is associated with Barrett's oesophagus formation following erosive oesophagitis. Methods: Retrospective review of endoscopies from September 2007 to December 2012 was performed. Inclusion criteria were erosive oesophagitis on index endoscopy, repeat endoscopy ≥6 weeks later and non-Hispanic white or African American ethnicity. Barrett's oesophagus frequency following erosive oesophagitis by ethnicity was compared. Results: A total of 14,303 patients underwent endoscopy during the study period; 1636 had erosive oesophagitis. Repeat endoscopy was performed on 125 non-Hispanic white or African American patients ≥6 weeks from the index procedure. Barrett's oesophagus occurred in 8% of non-Hispanic whites while no African American developed it on repeat endoscopy following erosive oesophagitis (. p=. 0.029). No significant difference was seen between ethnic groups in any clinical parameter assessed. Conclusions: African American ethnicity appears to result in decreased Barrett's oesophagus formation following erosive oesophagitis. Further investigation to demonstrate factors resulting in decreased Barrett's oesophagus formation among African Americans should be performed.

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