Age-related regulation of genes: Slow homeostatic changes and age-dimension technology

Kotoku Kurachi, Kezhong Zhang, Jeffrey Huo, Afshin Ameri, Mitsuhiro Kuwahara, Jean Marc Fontaine, Kei Yamamoto, Sumiko Kurachi

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Through systematic studies of pro- and anti-blood coagulation factors, we have determined molecular mechanisms involving two genetic elements, age-related stability element (ASE), GAGGAAG and age-related increase element (AIE), a unique stretch of dinucleotide repeats (AIE). ASE and AIE are essential for age-related patterns of stable and increased gene expression patterns, respectively. Such age-related gene regulatory mechanisms are also critical for explaining homeostasis in various physiological reactions as well as slow homeostatic changes in them. The age-related increase expression of the human factor IX (hFIX) gene requires the presence of both ASE and AIE, which apparently function additively. The anti-coagulant factor protein C (hPC) gene uses an ASE (CAGGAG) to produce age-related stable expression. Both ASE sequences (G/CAGAAG) share consensus sequence of the transcriptional factor PEA-3 element. No other similar sequences, including another PEA-3 consensus sequence, GAGGATG, function in conferring age-related gene regulation. The age-regulatory mechanisms involving ASE and AIE apparently function universally with different genes and across different animal species. These findings have led us to develop a new field of research and applications, which we named "age-dimension technology (ADT)". ADT has exciting potential for modifying age-related expression of genes as well as associated physiological processes, and developing novel, more effective prophylaxis or treatments for age-related diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)105-113
Number of pages9
JournalPhysica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications
Volume315
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2002
Externally publishedYes
EventSlow Dynamical Processes in Nature - Seoul, Korea, Republic of
Duration: Nov 25 2001Nov 27 2001

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genes
Gene
gene expression
prophylaxis
blood coagulation
homeostasis
blood
animals
proteins
Blood
Homeostasis
Gene Regulation
Human Factors
Coagulation
Stretch

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Statistics and Probability
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Age-related regulation of genes : Slow homeostatic changes and age-dimension technology. / Kurachi, Kotoku; Zhang, Kezhong; Huo, Jeffrey; Ameri, Afshin; Kuwahara, Mitsuhiro; Fontaine, Jean Marc; Yamamoto, Kei; Kurachi, Sumiko.

In: Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Vol. 315, No. 1-2, 15.11.2002, p. 105-113.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Kurachi, Kotoku ; Zhang, Kezhong ; Huo, Jeffrey ; Ameri, Afshin ; Kuwahara, Mitsuhiro ; Fontaine, Jean Marc ; Yamamoto, Kei ; Kurachi, Sumiko. / Age-related regulation of genes : Slow homeostatic changes and age-dimension technology. In: Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications. 2002 ; Vol. 315, No. 1-2. pp. 105-113.
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