Albumin levels in pregnancy: a hypothesis-decreased levels of albumin are related to increased levels of alpha-fetoprotein

James E. Maher, Robert L. Goldenberg, Tsunenobu Tamura, Suzanne P. Cliver, Howard J. Hoffman, Richard O. Davis, Larry Boots

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Serum albumin levels decrease during pregnancy while the concentration of most other maternal serum proteins of hepatic origin remain stable or increase. In a study of 289 women, most maternal characteristics such as race, age, smoking, a history of previous low birth-weight, infant sex and gestational age at delivery were not related to maternal serum albumin levels at 18 or 30 weeks' gestational age. The degree of maternal obesity significantly correlated with the concentration of albumin. There was a significant negative correlation in individual women between maternal serum levels of albumin and a-fetoprotein, with high levels of maternal serum a-fetoprotein predicting lower levels of albumin. We hypothesize that there may be a negative feedback effect of α-fetoprotein of fetal origin on the maternal production of albumin during pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)209-215
Number of pages7
JournalEarly Human Development
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1993
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Albumin
  • Alpha-fetoprotein
  • Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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