Amoxapine: A review of literature

T. A. Ban, W. H. Wilson, Joseph Patrick McEvoy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Amoxapine, a new antidepressant, is a tricyclic dibenzoxazepine compound, the demethylated metabolite of the neuroleptic loxapine. In animal pharmacological studies, amoxapine has shown striking similarities to imipramine. In contrast to the prototype anti-depressant drug, however, amoxapine does not interact with serotonin. In 10 uncontrolled clinical trials amoxapine was shown to have antidepressant effects in the dosage range of 100-300 mg/day. This was verified in 10 published standard, and placebo and standard controlled clinical studies in which amoxapine was superior to placebo and equal in overall therapeutic efficacy to imipramine and amitriptyline. Side effects were similar to the reference drugs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)166-170
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Pharmacopsychiatry
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1980
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Amoxapine
Imipramine
Dibenzoxazepines
Antidepressive Agents
Loxapine
Placebos
Amitriptyline
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Antipsychotic Agents
Serotonin
Clinical Trials
Pharmacology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Amoxapine : A review of literature. / Ban, T. A.; Wilson, W. H.; McEvoy, Joseph Patrick.

In: International Pharmacopsychiatry, Vol. 15, No. 3, 01.01.1980, p. 166-170.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Ban, T. A. ; Wilson, W. H. ; McEvoy, Joseph Patrick. / Amoxapine : A review of literature. In: International Pharmacopsychiatry. 1980 ; Vol. 15, No. 3. pp. 166-170.
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