An environmental intervention aimed at increasing physical activity levels in low-income women

Barbara J. Speck, Vicki Hines-Martin, Barbara A. Stetson, Stephen Warwick Looney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Regular physical activity is a health promotion and disease prevention behavior. Of all demographic groups, low-income women report the lowest levels of physical activity. RESEARCH OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to test an intervention aimed at reducing community environmental barriers to physical activity in low-income women. METHODS: The research design was mixed methodology: (1) quantitative (quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest, cohort design in which no treatment partitioning was possible) and (2) qualitative (focus groups). The setting was a church-sponsored community center centrally located in a low-income urban neighborhood. The comparison group was recruited first followed by the intervention group to control for setting. The sample consisted of 104 women (comparison group, n = 53; intervention group, n = 51) between the ages of 18 and 63 years who were residents of neighborhoods served by the community center. RESULTS: No between-group differences were found for physical activity behavior. Significant between-group differences in cholesterol (P = .007) and perception of physical activity (P = .033) were observed. Significant intervention group increases from pretest to posttest were found related to advanced registered nurse practitioner support, friend support, and more positive physical activity environment at the community center. Qualitative data supported and enriched the quantitative data. CONCLUSIONS: Physical activity levels were not significantly different between the groups. In a sample of low-income women who have multiple barriers, improving attitudes, expanding their knowledge of community resources, and providing physical activity opportunities in their neighborhoods are important intermediate steps toward initiation and maintenance of regular physical activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263-271
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Nursing
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2007

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Exercise
Nurse Practitioners
Health Promotion
Focus Groups
Research Design
Nurses
Cholesterol
Maintenance
Demography
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Intervention
  • Low-income women
  • Physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

An environmental intervention aimed at increasing physical activity levels in low-income women. / Speck, Barbara J.; Hines-Martin, Vicki; Stetson, Barbara A.; Looney, Stephen Warwick.

In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, Vol. 22, No. 4, 01.07.2007, p. 263-271.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Speck, Barbara J. ; Hines-Martin, Vicki ; Stetson, Barbara A. ; Looney, Stephen Warwick. / An environmental intervention aimed at increasing physical activity levels in low-income women. In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing. 2007 ; Vol. 22, No. 4. pp. 263-271.
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