An evaluation of a school-based AIDS/HIV education program for young adolescents

Cheryl L Newman, R. H. DuRant, C. S. Ashworth, G. Gaillard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study evaluated the efficacy of a school-based AIDS human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) education program on 6th and 7th grade students. Using a quasi-experimental pretest-posttest control group design, a control group and an education group (intervention I) received both pretest and posttest questionnaires and a second education group (intervention II) was posttested only. Students were evaluated using a modified version of the Centers for Disease Control's Health Risk Survey. Students who received AIDS education were less likely (p ≤ 0.0001) than the control group to report that they had changed their behavior to avoid getting AIDS, but thought they had a greater (p ≤ 0.0002) chance of acquiring AIDS as an adult. In the intervention I group, males who had never received prior AIDS instruction were more worried about acquiring AIDS as an adult (p ≤ 0.013). In the intervention II group, the education had a significant impact on the level of knowledge about AIDS/HIV infection (p ≤ 0.0003) and the degree of tolerance toward students with AIDS (p ≤ 0.0008), but the effect was not greater than the learning that occurred in the other 2 groups from testing alone. Students who were pretested were also less worried that they had been exposed to AIDS (p ≤ 0.0001), more worried that they would die if they acquired AIDS (p ≤ 0.05), and less likely to think AIDS patients should be isolated (p ≤ 0.0005). Although this AIDS education program appeared to be moderately successful in this group of younger adolescents, significant learning also occurred from testing alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)327-339
Number of pages13
JournalAIDS Education and Prevention
Volume5
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

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Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
AIDS
HIV
adolescent
Education
evaluation
school
education
Students
Group
group education
Control Groups
student
Learning
Virus Diseases
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Health Surveys
level of knowledge
health risk
learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

An evaluation of a school-based AIDS/HIV education program for young adolescents. / Newman, Cheryl L; DuRant, R. H.; Ashworth, C. S.; Gaillard, G.

In: AIDS Education and Prevention, Vol. 5, No. 4, 01.01.1993, p. 327-339.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Newman, CL, DuRant, RH, Ashworth, CS & Gaillard, G 1993, 'An evaluation of a school-based AIDS/HIV education program for young adolescents', AIDS Education and Prevention, vol. 5, no. 4, pp. 327-339.
Newman, Cheryl L ; DuRant, R. H. ; Ashworth, C. S. ; Gaillard, G. / An evaluation of a school-based AIDS/HIV education program for young adolescents. In: AIDS Education and Prevention. 1993 ; Vol. 5, No. 4. pp. 327-339.
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