An experimental test of adolescents' compliance with dental appointments

Karen P. West, Robert H. Durant, Robert A Pendergrast

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study assessed factors associated with adolescents' compliance with dental appointments. Patients (n = 162) attending an adolescent clinic were administered a pretest questionnaire assessing health locus of control, selfesteem, and beliefs and attitudes about dental health from the Health Belief Model. Adolescents needing dental care were randomly assigned to groups for whom their dental appointment was made by a health professional or one in which the patient made his or her own appointment and to groups receiving an appointment reminder card versus not receiving a reminder card. Dental records were then reviewed to examine previous experiences with dental treatment. Neither the method used for making the appointment nor the use of reminder cards had a significant effect on compliance with the dental appointments. Also, compliance was not associated with health locus of control, self-esteem, or variables from the Health Belief Model. Older patients were more noncompliant than younger patients (τ = 0.14). Noncompliance was negatively correlated with the number of previous dental visits and previous dental procedures, oral hygiene instruction, and x-rays. Number of previous x-rays and previous broken appointments explained 5.1% of the variation in noncompliance. The Health Belief Model was not successful in predicting compliance behavior in this sample of adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)384-389
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Appointments and Schedules
Tooth
Health
Internal-External Control
Compliance
Dental Records
X-Rays
Dental Care
Oral Hygiene
Self Concept

Keywords

  • Dental appointment keeping
  • Health belief model
  • Health locus of control
  • Patient compliance
  • Reminder cards
  • Self-esteem

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

An experimental test of adolescents' compliance with dental appointments. / West, Karen P.; Durant, Robert H.; Pendergrast, Robert A.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 14, No. 5, 01.01.1993, p. 384-389.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{45667312d8164569b1cc956cb3dc0d4c,
title = "An experimental test of adolescents' compliance with dental appointments",
abstract = "This study assessed factors associated with adolescents' compliance with dental appointments. Patients (n = 162) attending an adolescent clinic were administered a pretest questionnaire assessing health locus of control, selfesteem, and beliefs and attitudes about dental health from the Health Belief Model. Adolescents needing dental care were randomly assigned to groups for whom their dental appointment was made by a health professional or one in which the patient made his or her own appointment and to groups receiving an appointment reminder card versus not receiving a reminder card. Dental records were then reviewed to examine previous experiences with dental treatment. Neither the method used for making the appointment nor the use of reminder cards had a significant effect on compliance with the dental appointments. Also, compliance was not associated with health locus of control, self-esteem, or variables from the Health Belief Model. Older patients were more noncompliant than younger patients (τ = 0.14). Noncompliance was negatively correlated with the number of previous dental visits and previous dental procedures, oral hygiene instruction, and x-rays. Number of previous x-rays and previous broken appointments explained 5.1{\%} of the variation in noncompliance. The Health Belief Model was not successful in predicting compliance behavior in this sample of adolescents.",
keywords = "Dental appointment keeping, Health belief model, Health locus of control, Patient compliance, Reminder cards, Self-esteem",
author = "West, {Karen P.} and Durant, {Robert H.} and Pendergrast, {Robert A}",
year = "1993",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S1054-139X(08)80012-2",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
pages = "384--389",
journal = "Journal of Adolescent Health",
issn = "1054-139X",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - An experimental test of adolescents' compliance with dental appointments

AU - West, Karen P.

AU - Durant, Robert H.

AU - Pendergrast, Robert A

PY - 1993/1/1

Y1 - 1993/1/1

N2 - This study assessed factors associated with adolescents' compliance with dental appointments. Patients (n = 162) attending an adolescent clinic were administered a pretest questionnaire assessing health locus of control, selfesteem, and beliefs and attitudes about dental health from the Health Belief Model. Adolescents needing dental care were randomly assigned to groups for whom their dental appointment was made by a health professional or one in which the patient made his or her own appointment and to groups receiving an appointment reminder card versus not receiving a reminder card. Dental records were then reviewed to examine previous experiences with dental treatment. Neither the method used for making the appointment nor the use of reminder cards had a significant effect on compliance with the dental appointments. Also, compliance was not associated with health locus of control, self-esteem, or variables from the Health Belief Model. Older patients were more noncompliant than younger patients (τ = 0.14). Noncompliance was negatively correlated with the number of previous dental visits and previous dental procedures, oral hygiene instruction, and x-rays. Number of previous x-rays and previous broken appointments explained 5.1% of the variation in noncompliance. The Health Belief Model was not successful in predicting compliance behavior in this sample of adolescents.

AB - This study assessed factors associated with adolescents' compliance with dental appointments. Patients (n = 162) attending an adolescent clinic were administered a pretest questionnaire assessing health locus of control, selfesteem, and beliefs and attitudes about dental health from the Health Belief Model. Adolescents needing dental care were randomly assigned to groups for whom their dental appointment was made by a health professional or one in which the patient made his or her own appointment and to groups receiving an appointment reminder card versus not receiving a reminder card. Dental records were then reviewed to examine previous experiences with dental treatment. Neither the method used for making the appointment nor the use of reminder cards had a significant effect on compliance with the dental appointments. Also, compliance was not associated with health locus of control, self-esteem, or variables from the Health Belief Model. Older patients were more noncompliant than younger patients (τ = 0.14). Noncompliance was negatively correlated with the number of previous dental visits and previous dental procedures, oral hygiene instruction, and x-rays. Number of previous x-rays and previous broken appointments explained 5.1% of the variation in noncompliance. The Health Belief Model was not successful in predicting compliance behavior in this sample of adolescents.

KW - Dental appointment keeping

KW - Health belief model

KW - Health locus of control

KW - Patient compliance

KW - Reminder cards

KW - Self-esteem

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027267846&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027267846&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S1054-139X(08)80012-2

DO - 10.1016/S1054-139X(08)80012-2

M3 - Article

C2 - 8399251

AN - SCOPUS:0027267846

VL - 14

SP - 384

EP - 389

JO - Journal of Adolescent Health

JF - Journal of Adolescent Health

SN - 1054-139X

IS - 5

ER -