Androgen receptor and ALDH1 expression among internationally diverse patient populations

Evelyn Jiagge, Aisha Souleiman Jibril, Melissa B Davis, Carlos Murga-Zamalloa, Celina G. Kleer, Kofi Gyan, George Divine, Mark Hoenerhoff, Jessica Bensenhave, Baffour Awuah, Joseph Oppong, Ernest Adjei, Barbara Salem, Kathy Toy, Sofia Merajver, Max Wicha, Lisa Newman

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Abstract

Purpose Population-based incidence rates of breast cancers that are negative for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu (triple-negative breast cancer [TNBC]) are higher among African American (AA) compared with white American (WA) women, and TNBC prevalence is elevated among selected populations of African patients. The extent to which TNBC risk is related to East African versus West African ancestry, and whether these associations extend to expression of other biomarkers, is uncertain. Methods We used immunohistochemistry to evaluate estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu, androgen receptor and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) expression among WA (n = 153), AA (n = 76), Ethiopian (Eth)/East African (n = 90), and Ghanaian (Gh)/West African (n = 286) patients with breast cancer through an institutional review board-approved international research program. Results Mean age at diagnosis was 43, 49, 60, and 57 years for the Eth, Gh, AA, and WA patients, respectively. TNBC frequency was higher for AA and Gh patients (41% and 54%, respectively) compared with WA and Eth patients (23% and 15%, respectively; P < .001) Frequency of ALDH1 positivity was higher for AA and Gh patients (32% and 36%, respectively) compared with WA and Eth patients (23% and 17%, respectively; P = .007). Significant differences were observed for distribution of androgen receptor positivity: 71%, 55%, 42%, and 50% for the WA, AA, Gh, and Eth patients, respectively (P = .008). Conclusion Extent of African ancestry seems to be associated with particular breast cancer phenotypes. West African ancestry correlates with increased risk of TNBC and breast cancers that are positive for ALDH1.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Global Oncology
Volume2018
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

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Androgen Receptors
Triple Negative Breast Neoplasms
African Americans
Population
Breast Neoplasms
Progesterone Receptors
Estrogen Receptors
ErbB-2 Receptor
aldehyde dehydrogenase 1
Research Ethics Committees
Biomarkers
Immunohistochemistry
Phenotype
Incidence
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Jiagge, E., Jibril, A. S., Davis, M. B., Murga-Zamalloa, C., Kleer, C. G., Gyan, K., ... Newman, L. (2018). Androgen receptor and ALDH1 expression among internationally diverse patient populations. Journal of Global Oncology, 2018(4). https://doi.org/10.1200/JGO.18.00056

Androgen receptor and ALDH1 expression among internationally diverse patient populations. / Jiagge, Evelyn; Jibril, Aisha Souleiman; Davis, Melissa B; Murga-Zamalloa, Carlos; Kleer, Celina G.; Gyan, Kofi; Divine, George; Hoenerhoff, Mark; Bensenhave, Jessica; Awuah, Baffour; Oppong, Joseph; Adjei, Ernest; Salem, Barbara; Toy, Kathy; Merajver, Sofia; Wicha, Max; Newman, Lisa.

In: Journal of Global Oncology, Vol. 2018, No. 4, 01.03.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jiagge, E, Jibril, AS, Davis, MB, Murga-Zamalloa, C, Kleer, CG, Gyan, K, Divine, G, Hoenerhoff, M, Bensenhave, J, Awuah, B, Oppong, J, Adjei, E, Salem, B, Toy, K, Merajver, S, Wicha, M & Newman, L 2018, 'Androgen receptor and ALDH1 expression among internationally diverse patient populations', Journal of Global Oncology, vol. 2018, no. 4. https://doi.org/10.1200/JGO.18.00056
Jiagge, Evelyn ; Jibril, Aisha Souleiman ; Davis, Melissa B ; Murga-Zamalloa, Carlos ; Kleer, Celina G. ; Gyan, Kofi ; Divine, George ; Hoenerhoff, Mark ; Bensenhave, Jessica ; Awuah, Baffour ; Oppong, Joseph ; Adjei, Ernest ; Salem, Barbara ; Toy, Kathy ; Merajver, Sofia ; Wicha, Max ; Newman, Lisa. / Androgen receptor and ALDH1 expression among internationally diverse patient populations. In: Journal of Global Oncology. 2018 ; Vol. 2018, No. 4.
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abstract = "Purpose Population-based incidence rates of breast cancers that are negative for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu (triple-negative breast cancer [TNBC]) are higher among African American (AA) compared with white American (WA) women, and TNBC prevalence is elevated among selected populations of African patients. The extent to which TNBC risk is related to East African versus West African ancestry, and whether these associations extend to expression of other biomarkers, is uncertain. Methods We used immunohistochemistry to evaluate estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu, androgen receptor and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) expression among WA (n = 153), AA (n = 76), Ethiopian (Eth)/East African (n = 90), and Ghanaian (Gh)/West African (n = 286) patients with breast cancer through an institutional review board-approved international research program. Results Mean age at diagnosis was 43, 49, 60, and 57 years for the Eth, Gh, AA, and WA patients, respectively. TNBC frequency was higher for AA and Gh patients (41{\%} and 54{\%}, respectively) compared with WA and Eth patients (23{\%} and 15{\%}, respectively; P < .001) Frequency of ALDH1 positivity was higher for AA and Gh patients (32{\%} and 36{\%}, respectively) compared with WA and Eth patients (23{\%} and 17{\%}, respectively; P = .007). Significant differences were observed for distribution of androgen receptor positivity: 71{\%}, 55{\%}, 42{\%}, and 50{\%} for the WA, AA, Gh, and Eth patients, respectively (P = .008). Conclusion Extent of African ancestry seems to be associated with particular breast cancer phenotypes. West African ancestry correlates with increased risk of TNBC and breast cancers that are positive for ALDH1.",
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AU - Jibril, Aisha Souleiman

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AU - Kleer, Celina G.

AU - Gyan, Kofi

AU - Divine, George

AU - Hoenerhoff, Mark

AU - Bensenhave, Jessica

AU - Awuah, Baffour

AU - Oppong, Joseph

AU - Adjei, Ernest

AU - Salem, Barbara

AU - Toy, Kathy

AU - Merajver, Sofia

AU - Wicha, Max

AU - Newman, Lisa

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N2 - Purpose Population-based incidence rates of breast cancers that are negative for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu (triple-negative breast cancer [TNBC]) are higher among African American (AA) compared with white American (WA) women, and TNBC prevalence is elevated among selected populations of African patients. The extent to which TNBC risk is related to East African versus West African ancestry, and whether these associations extend to expression of other biomarkers, is uncertain. Methods We used immunohistochemistry to evaluate estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu, androgen receptor and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) expression among WA (n = 153), AA (n = 76), Ethiopian (Eth)/East African (n = 90), and Ghanaian (Gh)/West African (n = 286) patients with breast cancer through an institutional review board-approved international research program. Results Mean age at diagnosis was 43, 49, 60, and 57 years for the Eth, Gh, AA, and WA patients, respectively. TNBC frequency was higher for AA and Gh patients (41% and 54%, respectively) compared with WA and Eth patients (23% and 15%, respectively; P < .001) Frequency of ALDH1 positivity was higher for AA and Gh patients (32% and 36%, respectively) compared with WA and Eth patients (23% and 17%, respectively; P = .007). Significant differences were observed for distribution of androgen receptor positivity: 71%, 55%, 42%, and 50% for the WA, AA, Gh, and Eth patients, respectively (P = .008). Conclusion Extent of African ancestry seems to be associated with particular breast cancer phenotypes. West African ancestry correlates with increased risk of TNBC and breast cancers that are positive for ALDH1.

AB - Purpose Population-based incidence rates of breast cancers that are negative for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu (triple-negative breast cancer [TNBC]) are higher among African American (AA) compared with white American (WA) women, and TNBC prevalence is elevated among selected populations of African patients. The extent to which TNBC risk is related to East African versus West African ancestry, and whether these associations extend to expression of other biomarkers, is uncertain. Methods We used immunohistochemistry to evaluate estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu, androgen receptor and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) expression among WA (n = 153), AA (n = 76), Ethiopian (Eth)/East African (n = 90), and Ghanaian (Gh)/West African (n = 286) patients with breast cancer through an institutional review board-approved international research program. Results Mean age at diagnosis was 43, 49, 60, and 57 years for the Eth, Gh, AA, and WA patients, respectively. TNBC frequency was higher for AA and Gh patients (41% and 54%, respectively) compared with WA and Eth patients (23% and 15%, respectively; P < .001) Frequency of ALDH1 positivity was higher for AA and Gh patients (32% and 36%, respectively) compared with WA and Eth patients (23% and 17%, respectively; P = .007). Significant differences were observed for distribution of androgen receptor positivity: 71%, 55%, 42%, and 50% for the WA, AA, Gh, and Eth patients, respectively (P = .008). Conclusion Extent of African ancestry seems to be associated with particular breast cancer phenotypes. West African ancestry correlates with increased risk of TNBC and breast cancers that are positive for ALDH1.

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