Anidulafungin: A novel echinocandin

Jose Antonio Vazquez, Jack D. Sobel

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

135 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Until recently, the treatment available for serious fungal infections was composed of amphotericin B and azoles, and each class demonstrated significant limitations. Echinocandins are a new class of drugs that have shown promising results in treating a variety of fungal infections. Of these, anidulafungin is a novel echinocandin that appears to have several advantages over existing antifungals. It is unique because it slowly degrades in humans, undergoing a process of biotransformation rather than being metabolized. It has potent in vitro activity against Aspergillus and Candida species, including those resistant to fluconazole or amphotericin B. Results of several clinical trials indicate that anidulafungin is effective in treating esophageal candidiasis, including azole-refractory disease. The results of a recent study comparing fluconazole versus anidulafungin demonstrated the superiority of anidulafungin in the treatment of candidemia and invasive candidiasis (IC). Studies evaluating the concomitant use of anidulafungin and either amphotericin B, voriconazole, or cyclosporine did not demonstrate significant drug-drug interactions or adverse events. To date, anidulafungin appears to have an excellent safety profile. On the basis of early clinical experience, it appears that anidulafungin will be a valuable asset in the management of serious and difficult-to-treat fungal infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)215-222
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2006

Fingerprint

anidulafungin
Echinocandins
Mycoses
Amphotericin B
Azoles
Fluconazole
Invasive Candidiasis
Candidemia
Candidiasis
Aspergillus
Biotransformation
Drug Interactions
Candida
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Cyclosporine
Clinical Trials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Anidulafungin : A novel echinocandin. / Vazquez, Jose Antonio; Sobel, Jack D.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 43, No. 2, 15.07.2006, p. 215-222.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Vazquez, Jose Antonio ; Sobel, Jack D. / Anidulafungin : A novel echinocandin. In: Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2006 ; Vol. 43, No. 2. pp. 215-222.
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