Animal Models of Bone Disease-B

Meghan Elizabeth McGee Lawrence, Frank J. Secreto, Farhan A. Syed

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The skeleton is a multifunctional organ system that serves several vital roles in the body. Although bone has the ability to remodel itself to repair damage and respond to calcium demands, it is subject to the rigors of aging, hormonal changes, and environment. Understanding the mechanisms that cause bone loss is an important facet of human medicine. Animal models permit mechanistic study of processes that regulate development and maintenance of skeletal mass, enabling meticulous investigation of new orthopedic strategies or bone-targeted pharmacologic therapies. The selection of an appropriate animal model, choice of skeletal analysis techniques, and proper interpretation of data are vital components of experimental design and analysis in bone research. In this chapter, we review time-tested criteria for choosing appropriate animal models, describe several common animal models of osteoporosis, and summarize some of the basic methodology available for in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro analysis of skeletal biology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAnimal Models for the Study of Human Disease
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages391-417
Number of pages27
ISBN (Print)9780124158948
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bone Diseases
Bone
Animals
Animal Models
Bone and Bones
Orthopedics
Skeleton
Design of experiments
Osteoporosis
Medicine
Repair
Research Design
Aging of materials
Maintenance
Calcium
Research
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Adipocytes
  • Animal models
  • Bone loss
  • Bone strength
  • Ex vivo models
  • Inbred mouse strains
  • Osteoblasts
  • Osteoporosis
  • Ovariectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

McGee Lawrence, M. E., Secreto, F. J., & Syed, F. A. (2013). Animal Models of Bone Disease-B. In Animal Models for the Study of Human Disease (pp. 391-417). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-415894-8.00017-8

Animal Models of Bone Disease-B. / McGee Lawrence, Meghan Elizabeth; Secreto, Frank J.; Syed, Farhan A.

Animal Models for the Study of Human Disease. Elsevier Inc., 2013. p. 391-417.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

McGee Lawrence, ME, Secreto, FJ & Syed, FA 2013, Animal Models of Bone Disease-B. in Animal Models for the Study of Human Disease. Elsevier Inc., pp. 391-417. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-415894-8.00017-8
McGee Lawrence ME, Secreto FJ, Syed FA. Animal Models of Bone Disease-B. In Animal Models for the Study of Human Disease. Elsevier Inc. 2013. p. 391-417 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-415894-8.00017-8
McGee Lawrence, Meghan Elizabeth ; Secreto, Frank J. ; Syed, Farhan A. / Animal Models of Bone Disease-B. Animal Models for the Study of Human Disease. Elsevier Inc., 2013. pp. 391-417
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