Antibiotic treatment of Lyme disease

Current recommendations by stage and extent of infection

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Much has been learned about Lyme disease over the past several years, but much remains to be learned. Careful clinical observation has led to elucidation of the natural history of this disease, and further clinical observations are needed to unravel the remaining areas of uncertainty. It is by no means clear that all the symptoms attributed to Lyme disease today actually represent true manifestations of Borrelia burgdorferi infection or that patients with well-documented Lyme disease whose symptoms do not respond to antibiotic therapy have persistent infection. Immunologically mediated mechanisms may be responsible for the chronic disease manifestations that seem so resistant to antibiotics. Uncovering answers to these questions requires the close collaboration of astute practicing physicians and biomedical scientists working together for their patients' benefit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-64
Number of pages8
JournalPostgraduate Medicine
Volume91
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

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Lyme Disease
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Infection
Borrelia Infections
Naphazoline
Borrelia burgdorferi
Uncertainty
Chronic Disease
Therapeutics
Observation
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Antibiotic treatment of Lyme disease : Current recommendations by stage and extent of infection. / Rahn, Daniel Wallace.

In: Postgraduate Medicine, Vol. 91, No. 7, 01.01.1992, p. 57-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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