Antibodies and Vaccines as Novel Cancer Therapeutics

Svetomir N. Markovic, Esteban Celis

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter discusses the basic principles of antitumor antibody and vaccine development with illustrative examples of agents currently in clinical use. The realm of antibody-based cancer immunotherapeutics is divided into two categories, including unmodified monoclonal antibodies with cytotoxic, regulatory, and immunization properties, and immunoconjugates. The most significant developments in antibody-based cancer immunotherapeutics has been the discovery of monoclonal antibodies demonstrating direct anti-tumor cytotoxic properties. Immunotoxins represent the largest component of the immunoconjugate effort. Cancer vaccines represent an attempt to actively immunize patients against single or multiple tumor-specific antigens. The role of immune adjuvants in the cancer vaccine is to enhance the immunogenicity of the antigen. An example of a tumor-specific antigen containing immunodominant peptides capable of stimulating anti-tumor T-cell responses is MAGE-1. The MAGE-1 antigen is encoded by a gene spanning 5 kb, and the 2419 base pair sequence produces a predicted protein product of 26 kDa.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationNovel Anticancer Agents
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages207-221
Number of pages15
ISBN (Print)9780120885619
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tumors
Vaccines
Immunoconjugates
Antigens
Cancer Vaccines
Antibodies
Neoplasm Antigens
Neoplasms
Monoclonal Antibodies
Immunization
Immunotoxins
T-cells
Therapeutics
Base Pairing
Genes
T-Lymphocytes
Peptides
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Markovic, S. N., & Celis, E. (2006). Antibodies and Vaccines as Novel Cancer Therapeutics. In Novel Anticancer Agents (pp. 207-221). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-012088561-9/50008-9

Antibodies and Vaccines as Novel Cancer Therapeutics. / Markovic, Svetomir N.; Celis, Esteban.

Novel Anticancer Agents. Elsevier Inc., 2006. p. 207-221.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Markovic, SN & Celis, E 2006, Antibodies and Vaccines as Novel Cancer Therapeutics. in Novel Anticancer Agents. Elsevier Inc., pp. 207-221. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-012088561-9/50008-9
Markovic SN, Celis E. Antibodies and Vaccines as Novel Cancer Therapeutics. In Novel Anticancer Agents. Elsevier Inc. 2006. p. 207-221 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-012088561-9/50008-9
Markovic, Svetomir N. ; Celis, Esteban. / Antibodies and Vaccines as Novel Cancer Therapeutics. Novel Anticancer Agents. Elsevier Inc., 2006. pp. 207-221
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