Antibodies to hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus in alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis

Their prevalence and clinical relevance

Charles L. Mendenhall, Leonard Seeff, Anna Mae Diehl, Saad J. Ghosn, Samuel W. French, Peter S. Gartside, Susan D. Rouster, Zelma Buskell‐Bales, Charles J. Grossman, Gary A. Roselle, Robert E. Weesner, Pedro Garcia‐Pont, Stephen J. Goldberg, Thomas W. Kiernan, Carlo H. Tamburro, Rowen Zetterman, Antonio Chedid, Thomas Chen, Lionel Rabin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Patients with overt alcoholic liver disease who had participated in a multicenter therapeutic trial and subgroups of controls (i.e., alcoholic patients without liver disease and patients with neither alcoholism nor liver disease) were tested for hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus antibodies to determine the prevalence of these antibodies and any clinical association in the progression and outcome of alcoholic liver disease. Antibodies to hepatitis B (anti–HBs and/or anti‐HBc) were found in 29.2% of patients with alcoholic liver disease, in 26.1% of hospitalized alcoholic patients without liver disease and in 24.2% of hospitalized nonalcoholic patients without liver disease; frequencies were not significantly different from one another. HBsAg was not evaluated because HBsAg+ patients had been excluded from the original trial. The presence of these antibody markers correlated with ethnic origin of and immunoglobulin levels in the patients. In contrast, antibody to hepatitis C, as detected by enzyme immunoassay, was positive in 27.1%, 4.8% and 3.0% of the three groups, respectively, the first differing significantly from the other two. Antibody to hepatitis C virus positivity correlated significantly with clinical severity of the disease and with the presence of histological features that imply chronic viral infection (periportal inflammation, cirrhosis), despite the fact that the supplementary assay for antibody to hepatitis C virus, using recombinant immunoblot assay, reduced the positive rate by 79%. Although the presence of hepatitis B antibodies did not correlate with patient survival, some categories of patients with antibody to hepatitis C virus did; the survival of those with antibody to hepatitis C virus and recombinant immunoblot assay reactivity was 67%; for those with antibody to hepatitis C virus positivity but recombinant immunoblot assay negativity the survival was 29% (p < 0.01). The reason for the poor prognosis for those with antibody to hepatitis C virus positivity and recombinant immunoblot assay negativity is not clear, although some theories are offered. (HEPATOLOGY 1991;14:581–589.)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)581-589
Number of pages9
JournalHepatology
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1991

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Alcoholic Hepatitis
Hepatitis B Antibodies
Alcoholic Liver Cirrhosis
Hepatitis C Antibodies
Hepacivirus
Alcoholic Liver Diseases
Liver Diseases
Alcoholics
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens
Survival
Antibodies
Virus Diseases
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Hepatitis B virus
Alcoholism
Multicenter Studies
Immunoglobulins
Fibrosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology

Cite this

Mendenhall, C. L., Seeff, L., Diehl, A. M., Ghosn, S. J., French, S. W., Gartside, P. S., ... Rabin, L. (1991). Antibodies to hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus in alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis: Their prevalence and clinical relevance. Hepatology, 14(4), 581-589. https://doi.org/10.1002/hep.1840140402

Antibodies to hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus in alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis : Their prevalence and clinical relevance. / Mendenhall, Charles L.; Seeff, Leonard; Diehl, Anna Mae; Ghosn, Saad J.; French, Samuel W.; Gartside, Peter S.; Rouster, Susan D.; Buskell‐Bales, Zelma; Grossman, Charles J.; Roselle, Gary A.; Weesner, Robert E.; Garcia‐Pont, Pedro; Goldberg, Stephen J.; Kiernan, Thomas W.; Tamburro, Carlo H.; Zetterman, Rowen; Chedid, Antonio; Chen, Thomas; Rabin, Lionel.

In: Hepatology, Vol. 14, No. 4, 01.10.1991, p. 581-589.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mendenhall, CL, Seeff, L, Diehl, AM, Ghosn, SJ, French, SW, Gartside, PS, Rouster, SD, Buskell‐Bales, Z, Grossman, CJ, Roselle, GA, Weesner, RE, Garcia‐Pont, P, Goldberg, SJ, Kiernan, TW, Tamburro, CH, Zetterman, R, Chedid, A, Chen, T & Rabin, L 1991, 'Antibodies to hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus in alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis: Their prevalence and clinical relevance', Hepatology, vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 581-589. https://doi.org/10.1002/hep.1840140402
Mendenhall, Charles L. ; Seeff, Leonard ; Diehl, Anna Mae ; Ghosn, Saad J. ; French, Samuel W. ; Gartside, Peter S. ; Rouster, Susan D. ; Buskell‐Bales, Zelma ; Grossman, Charles J. ; Roselle, Gary A. ; Weesner, Robert E. ; Garcia‐Pont, Pedro ; Goldberg, Stephen J. ; Kiernan, Thomas W. ; Tamburro, Carlo H. ; Zetterman, Rowen ; Chedid, Antonio ; Chen, Thomas ; Rabin, Lionel. / Antibodies to hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus in alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis : Their prevalence and clinical relevance. In: Hepatology. 1991 ; Vol. 14, No. 4. pp. 581-589.
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AU - French, Samuel W.

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AU - Rouster, Susan D.

AU - Buskell‐Bales, Zelma

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