Aspirin-induced increases in soluble IL-1 receptor type II concentrations in vitro and in vivo

Jane M. Daun, Richard W. Ball, Heather R. Burger, Joseph G. Cannon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the influence of low-dose aspirin on interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), and soluble receptor type II (sIL-1RII) secretion in vivo and in vitro. Blood mononuclear cells were isolated from healthy young men who ingested 81 mg of aspirin on alternate days for 2 weeks and from unmedicated controls. Aspirin had minor effects on ex vivo secretion of IL-1β and no influence on IL-1ra. In contrast, unstimulated ex vivo secretion of sIL-1RII was over twice as high by cells from aspirin-treated subjects (1115 ± 123 vs. 460 ± 77 pg/mL, P = 0.02). Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated sIL-1RII secretion was influenced similarly. Plasma sIL-1RII concentrations were 23% higher in aspirin-treated subjects (10.2 ± 0.6 vs. 8.4 ± 0.3 ng/mL, P = 0.03). In addition, cells from unmedicated subjects cultured in vitro with aspirin (10 μg/mL) secreted significantly greater amounts of sIL-1RII. Thus, low-dose aspirin therapy may prevent inflammation by increasing soluble receptor secretion, thereby preventing IL-1 from binding target cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)863-866
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Leukocyte Biology
Volume65
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

Fingerprint

Interleukin-1 Type II Receptors
Interleukin-1
Aspirin
Interleukin-1 Receptors
Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein
Interleukins
In Vitro Techniques
Lipopolysaccharides
Blood Cells
Inflammation

Keywords

  • Endotoxin
  • Human mononuclear cells
  • IL-1β

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Aspirin-induced increases in soluble IL-1 receptor type II concentrations in vitro and in vivo. / Daun, Jane M.; Ball, Richard W.; Burger, Heather R.; Cannon, Joseph G.

In: Journal of Leukocyte Biology, Vol. 65, No. 6, 01.01.1999, p. 863-866.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Daun, Jane M. ; Ball, Richard W. ; Burger, Heather R. ; Cannon, Joseph G. / Aspirin-induced increases in soluble IL-1 receptor type II concentrations in vitro and in vivo. In: Journal of Leukocyte Biology. 1999 ; Vol. 65, No. 6. pp. 863-866.
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