Assessing myogenic response and vasoactivity in resistance mesenteric arteries using pressure myography

Ravirajsinh N. Jadeja, Vikrant Rachakonda, Zsolt Bagi, Sandeep Khurana

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Small resistance arteries constrict and dilate respectively in response to increased or decreased intraluminal pressure; this phenomenon known as myogenic response is a key regulator of local blood flow. In isobaric conditions small resistance arteries develop sustained constriction known as myogenic tone (MT), which is a major determinant of systemic vascular resistance (SVR). Hence, ex vivo pressurized preparations of small resistance arteries are major tools to study microvascular function in near-physiological states. To achieve this, a freshly isolated intact segment of a small resistance artery (diameter ~260 μm) is mounted onto two small glass cannulas and pressurized. These arterial preparations retain most in vivo characteristics and permit assessment of vascular tone in real-time. Here we provide a detailed protocol for assessing vasoactivity in pressurized small resistance mesenteric arteries from rats; these arteries develop sustained vasoconstriction - approximately 25% of maximal diameter - when pressurized at 70 mmHg. These arterial preparations may be used to study the effect of investigational compounds on relationship between intra-arterial pressure and vasoactivity and determine changes in microvascular function in animal models of various diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere50997
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Visualized Experiments
Volume2015
Issue number101
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 6 2015

Fingerprint

Myography
Mesenteric Arteries
Arteries
Pressure
Rats
Animals
Blood
Glass
Animal Disease Models
Vasoconstriction
Constriction
Vascular Resistance
Blood Vessels
Arterial Pressure

Keywords

  • Arterioles
  • Hypertension
  • Hypotension
  • Medicine
  • Mesenteric artery
  • Muscle
  • Myogenic response
  • Myogenic tone
  • Pressure myography
  • Resistance arteries
  • Smooth
  • Superior
  • Vascular

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Assessing myogenic response and vasoactivity in resistance mesenteric arteries using pressure myography. / Jadeja, Ravirajsinh N.; Rachakonda, Vikrant; Bagi, Zsolt; Khurana, Sandeep.

In: Journal of Visualized Experiments, Vol. 2015, No. 101, e50997, 06.07.2015, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jadeja, Ravirajsinh N. ; Rachakonda, Vikrant ; Bagi, Zsolt ; Khurana, Sandeep. / Assessing myogenic response and vasoactivity in resistance mesenteric arteries using pressure myography. In: Journal of Visualized Experiments. 2015 ; Vol. 2015, No. 101. pp. 1-7.
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