Assessing the Elite Publication Benefits of Academic Pedigree: A Joint Examination of PhD Institution and Employment Institution

Matthew M. Wieland, Mark C. Dawkins, Michael Timothy Dugan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This descriptive study is a joint analysis that assesses the relative importance of PhD institution vs. employment institution for publication success in elite accounting journals. Specifically, we examine the association between academic pedigree (i.e., graduating from and/or being employed at a top 25, 26–50, or 51–75 accounting program) and publication success in elite accounting journals from 1990 to 2013. Our pairwise and multivariate analyses quantify the significant associations between (1) published articles and whether faculty graduated from top 25, 26–50, or 51–75 accounting programs, (2) published articles and whether faculty were employed at top 25, 26–50, or 51–75 accounting programs, and (3) published articles and whether faculty jointly graduated from and were employed at top 25, 26–50, or 51–75 accounting programs. We also find differences for top 3 vs. top 6 accounting journals, and for private vs. public institutions. Overall, the analyses reveal that employment institution is more significantly associated with publications in elite accounting journals than the PhD institution, while the PhD institution is generally significant only for graduates of top 25 institutions. These findings are relevant to prospective and current PhD students, faculty at elite institutions who change schools, and accounting program administrators and deans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)269-309
Number of pages41
JournalAccounting Perspectives
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

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Elites
Relative importance
Public institutions

Keywords

  • Academic pedigree
  • Accounting program rankings
  • Accounting publications
  • Accounting rankings
  • Degree prestige
  • Elite degree
  • Elite institution
  • Employment institution
  • Faculty publications
  • Institution prestige
  • PhD institution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Accounting
  • Finance

Cite this

Assessing the Elite Publication Benefits of Academic Pedigree : A Joint Examination of PhD Institution and Employment Institution. / Wieland, Matthew M.; Dawkins, Mark C.; Dugan, Michael Timothy.

In: Accounting Perspectives, Vol. 15, No. 4, 01.12.2016, p. 269-309.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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