Assessment of the family

Systemic and developmental perspectives

Bernard Davidson, W. H. Quinn, A. M. Josephson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Why was Elizabeth the symptomatic family member? This challenging question is informed by the family assessment, which examines family process patterns, family structure, family history, and developmental challenges of individual family members and the family as a whole. Although the answer to this question may never be explained completely, the family assessment does contribute to the biopsychosocial formulation on which rational therapeutic intervention is based. The family assessment does not replace a clinical assessment of the identified patient. Rather, the use of the family assessment provides a greater breadth from which to view children and adolesents' presenting complaints.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)415-429
Number of pages15
JournalChild and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America
Volume10
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 26 2001

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Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Assessment of the family : Systemic and developmental perspectives. / Davidson, Bernard; Quinn, W. H.; Josephson, A. M.

In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America, Vol. 10, No. 3, 26.06.2001, p. 415-429.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Davidson, Bernard ; Quinn, W. H. ; Josephson, A. M. / Assessment of the family : Systemic and developmental perspectives. In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America. 2001 ; Vol. 10, No. 3. pp. 415-429.
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