Assisted Reproductive Technology and Newborn Size in Singletons Resulting from Fresh and Cryopreserved Embryos Transfer

Galit Levi Dunietz, Claudia Holzman, Yujia Zhang, Nicole M Talge, Chenxi Li, David Todem, Sheree L Boulet, Patricia McKane, Dmitry M Kissin, Glenn Copeland, Dana Bernson, Michael P Diamond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES AND STUDY DESIGN: The aim of this study was two-fold: to investigate the association of Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) and small newborn size, using standardized measures; and to examine within strata of fresh and cryopreserved embryos transfer, whether this association is influenced by parental infertility diagnoses. We used a population-based retrospective cohort from Michigan (2000-2009), Florida and Massachusetts (2000-2010). Our sample included 28,946 ART singletons conceived with non-donor oocytes and 4,263,846 non-ART singletons.

METHODS: Regression models were used to examine the association of ART and newborn size, measured as small for gestational age (SGA) and birth-weight-z-score, among four mutually exclusive infertility groups: female infertility only, male infertility only, combined female and male infertility, and unexplained infertility, stratified by fresh and cryopreserved embryos transfer.

RESULTS: We found increased SGA odds among ART singletons from fresh embryos transfer compared with non-ART singletons, with little difference by infertility source [adjusted odds-ratio for SGA among female infertility only: 1.18 (95% CI 1.10, 1.26), male infertility only: 1.20 (95% CI 1.10, 1.32), male and female infertility: 1.18 (95% CI 1.06, 1.31) and unexplained infertility: 1.24 (95% CI 1.10, 1.38)]. Conversely, ART singletons, born following cryopreserved embryos transfer, had lower SGA odds compared with non-ART singletons, with mild variation by infertility source [adjusted odds-ratio for SGA among female infertility only: 0.56 (95% CI 0.45, 0.71), male infertility only: 0.64 (95% CI 0.47, 0.86), male and female infertility: 0.52 (95% CI 0.36, 0.77) and unexplained infertility: 0.71 (95% CI 0.47, 1.06)]. Birth-weight-z-score was significantly lower for ART singletons born following fresh embryos transfer than non-ART singletons, regardless of infertility diagnoses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0169869
Pages (from-to)e0169869
JournalPLoS One
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 23 2017
Externally publishedYes

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assisted reproductive technologies
Assisted Reproductive Techniques
small for gestational age
female fertility
Embryo Transfer
male fertility
embryo transfer
Female Infertility
Infertility
Male Infertility
neonates
Reproductive Techniques
Gestational Age
birth weight
odds ratio
Birth Weight
Odds Ratio
oocytes
Oocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Assisted Reproductive Technology and Newborn Size in Singletons Resulting from Fresh and Cryopreserved Embryos Transfer. / Levi Dunietz, Galit; Holzman, Claudia; Zhang, Yujia; Talge, Nicole M; Li, Chenxi; Todem, David; Boulet, Sheree L; McKane, Patricia; Kissin, Dmitry M; Copeland, Glenn; Bernson, Dana; Diamond, Michael P.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 12, No. 1, e0169869, 23.01.2017, p. e0169869.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Levi Dunietz, G, Holzman, C, Zhang, Y, Talge, NM, Li, C, Todem, D, Boulet, SL, McKane, P, Kissin, DM, Copeland, G, Bernson, D & Diamond, MP 2017, 'Assisted Reproductive Technology and Newborn Size in Singletons Resulting from Fresh and Cryopreserved Embryos Transfer', PLoS One, vol. 12, no. 1, e0169869, pp. e0169869. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0169869
Levi Dunietz, Galit ; Holzman, Claudia ; Zhang, Yujia ; Talge, Nicole M ; Li, Chenxi ; Todem, David ; Boulet, Sheree L ; McKane, Patricia ; Kissin, Dmitry M ; Copeland, Glenn ; Bernson, Dana ; Diamond, Michael P. / Assisted Reproductive Technology and Newborn Size in Singletons Resulting from Fresh and Cryopreserved Embryos Transfer. In: PLoS One. 2017 ; Vol. 12, No. 1. pp. e0169869.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVES AND STUDY DESIGN: The aim of this study was two-fold: to investigate the association of Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) and small newborn size, using standardized measures; and to examine within strata of fresh and cryopreserved embryos transfer, whether this association is influenced by parental infertility diagnoses. We used a population-based retrospective cohort from Michigan (2000-2009), Florida and Massachusetts (2000-2010). Our sample included 28,946 ART singletons conceived with non-donor oocytes and 4,263,846 non-ART singletons.METHODS: Regression models were used to examine the association of ART and newborn size, measured as small for gestational age (SGA) and birth-weight-z-score, among four mutually exclusive infertility groups: female infertility only, male infertility only, combined female and male infertility, and unexplained infertility, stratified by fresh and cryopreserved embryos transfer.RESULTS: We found increased SGA odds among ART singletons from fresh embryos transfer compared with non-ART singletons, with little difference by infertility source [adjusted odds-ratio for SGA among female infertility only: 1.18 (95{\%} CI 1.10, 1.26), male infertility only: 1.20 (95{\%} CI 1.10, 1.32), male and female infertility: 1.18 (95{\%} CI 1.06, 1.31) and unexplained infertility: 1.24 (95{\%} CI 1.10, 1.38)]. Conversely, ART singletons, born following cryopreserved embryos transfer, had lower SGA odds compared with non-ART singletons, with mild variation by infertility source [adjusted odds-ratio for SGA among female infertility only: 0.56 (95{\%} CI 0.45, 0.71), male infertility only: 0.64 (95{\%} CI 0.47, 0.86), male and female infertility: 0.52 (95{\%} CI 0.36, 0.77) and unexplained infertility: 0.71 (95{\%} CI 0.47, 1.06)]. Birth-weight-z-score was significantly lower for ART singletons born following fresh embryos transfer than non-ART singletons, regardless of infertility diagnoses.",
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AU - Talge, Nicole M

AU - Li, Chenxi

AU - Todem, David

AU - Boulet, Sheree L

AU - McKane, Patricia

AU - Kissin, Dmitry M

AU - Copeland, Glenn

AU - Bernson, Dana

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N2 - OBJECTIVES AND STUDY DESIGN: The aim of this study was two-fold: to investigate the association of Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) and small newborn size, using standardized measures; and to examine within strata of fresh and cryopreserved embryos transfer, whether this association is influenced by parental infertility diagnoses. We used a population-based retrospective cohort from Michigan (2000-2009), Florida and Massachusetts (2000-2010). Our sample included 28,946 ART singletons conceived with non-donor oocytes and 4,263,846 non-ART singletons.METHODS: Regression models were used to examine the association of ART and newborn size, measured as small for gestational age (SGA) and birth-weight-z-score, among four mutually exclusive infertility groups: female infertility only, male infertility only, combined female and male infertility, and unexplained infertility, stratified by fresh and cryopreserved embryos transfer.RESULTS: We found increased SGA odds among ART singletons from fresh embryos transfer compared with non-ART singletons, with little difference by infertility source [adjusted odds-ratio for SGA among female infertility only: 1.18 (95% CI 1.10, 1.26), male infertility only: 1.20 (95% CI 1.10, 1.32), male and female infertility: 1.18 (95% CI 1.06, 1.31) and unexplained infertility: 1.24 (95% CI 1.10, 1.38)]. Conversely, ART singletons, born following cryopreserved embryos transfer, had lower SGA odds compared with non-ART singletons, with mild variation by infertility source [adjusted odds-ratio for SGA among female infertility only: 0.56 (95% CI 0.45, 0.71), male infertility only: 0.64 (95% CI 0.47, 0.86), male and female infertility: 0.52 (95% CI 0.36, 0.77) and unexplained infertility: 0.71 (95% CI 0.47, 1.06)]. Birth-weight-z-score was significantly lower for ART singletons born following fresh embryos transfer than non-ART singletons, regardless of infertility diagnoses.

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