Attitudes toward LGBT patients among students in the health professions: Influence of demographics and discipline

Christina K. Wilson, Lindsey West, Lara Stepleman, Margo Villarosa, Brittany Ange, Matthew Decker, Jennifer L. Waller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Health providers' personal and professional experiences may predict attitudes toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals and can therefore serve as key targets for health professions training aimed at decreasing barriers to high-quality patient care. This study explored the relationship between professional, demographic, and training characteristics and health professions student attitudes toward LGBT patients. Methods: Students from a health sciences university and applied mental health programs in Georgia (N= 475) completed a survey that included a modified version of the Attitudes Toward LGBT Patients Scale (ATLPS). Results: Profession, sexual orientation, current financial status, religion, religiosity, spirituality, and self-reported familiarity with various religious perspectives on sex were associated with ATLPS scores. However, religiosity and self-reported familiarity with various religious perspectives on sex were the only significant predictors of ATLPS scores when these variables were included in one general linear model. Conclusions: Health professions students with higher levels of religiosity and lower levels of self-reported familiarity with various religious perspectives on sex reported less positive attitudes toward LGBT individuals. Results suggest that personal factors may be important to address in interprofessional curriculum related to LGBT patient care. Self-report biases and other factors may limit the accuracy and generalizability of the findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)204-211
Number of pages8
JournalLGBT Health
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2014

Keywords

  • LGBT
  • health professions
  • interprofessional training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Urology

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