Attitudinal and behavioral correlates of condom use in urban adolescent males

Robert A Pendergrast, Robert H. DuRant, Gregory L. Gaillard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Scopus citations

Abstract

To determine correlates of condom use in adolescent males, we administered a sexual behavior questionnaire to 105 urban males attending a general adolescent clinic. The mean age was 16.5 ± 1.6 years, and all reported heterosexual activity during the prior 3 months. Condom use was significantly (p < 0.05) associated with perceived hassle of use (Spearman's ρ{variant} = - 0.40), perception of girlfriend's attitude toward condoms (ρ{variant} = - 0.36), self-confidence in correct use (ρ{variant} = 0.26), younger age (ρ{variant} = 0.25), reported degree of exposure to sexually transmitted disease (STD) education (ρ{variant} = 0.23), perceived condom safety (ρ{variant} = 0.23), and perceived risk of STD if not wearing a condom (ρ{variant} = 0.21). Using stepwise multiple regression, four variables explained a significant amount of variation in condom use: perceived hassle of use, perceived girlfriend's attitude toward condom use, age, and self-confidence in correct use (adjusted R2 = 0.28, p < 0.001). Intention to use free condoms was significantly (p < 0.05) associated with past use (ρ{variant} = 0.63), girlfriend's attitude toward use (ρ{variant} = - 0.46), self-confidence in correct use (ρ{variant} = 0.36), perceived hassle (ρ{variant} = - 0.31), and degree of exposure to STD education (ρ{variant} = 0.25). Three variables in a regression model explained a significant amount of variation in intent to use free condoms: selfreported past use, girlfriend's attitude, and self-confidence in correct use (adjusted R2 = 0.51, p < 0.001).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)133-139
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1992

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Keywords

  • Sex behavior Sexually transmitted diseases Male contraceptive devices Adolescence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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