Biomechanical changes from long-term freezer storage and cellular reduction of tracheal scaffoldings

Matthew C. Jones, Frederick Rueggeberg, Aaron J. Cunningham, Hunter Allen Faircloth, Tanima Jana, Donald Mettenburg, Jennifer L Waller, Gregory N Postma, Paul M. Weinberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis: To determine structural biomechanical changes in tracheal scaffolds resulting from cellular reduction and storage at 280°C.

Study Design: Laboratory-based study.

Methods: Forty-four rabbit tracheal segments were separated into four treatment groups: untreated (group A, control), cellular-reduced (group B), storage at 280°C followed by cellular reduction (group C), and cellular-reduced followed by storage at 280°C (group D). Tracheal segments were subjected to uniaxial tension (n521) or compression (n523) using a universal testing machine to determine sutured tensile yield load and radial compressive strengths at 50% lumen occlusion. Mean differences among groups for tension and compression were compared by analysis of variance with post-hoc Tukey-Kramer test.

Results: The untreated trachea (group A) demonstrated mean yield strength of 5.93 (± 1.65) N and compressive strength of 2.10 (± 0.51) N. Following treatment/storage, the tensile yield strength was not impaired (group B56.79 [± 1.58] N, C56.21 [± 1.40] N, D56.26 [± 1.18]; P>0.10 each). Following cellular reduction, there was a significant reduction in compressive strength (group B50.44 N [± 0.13], P<0.0001), but no further reduction due to storage (group C50.39 N [± 0.10]; P50.97 compared to group B).

Conclusion: The data suggest cellular reduction leads to loss of compressive strength. Freezing at -80°C (either before, or subsequent to cellular reduction) may be a viable storage method for tracheal grafts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E16-E22
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume125
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Compressive Strength
Tensile Strength
Trachea
Freezing
Analysis of Variance
Rabbits
Transplants
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Allograft
  • Mechanical phenomena
  • Tensile strength
  • Tissue engineering
  • Tissue transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Biomechanical changes from long-term freezer storage and cellular reduction of tracheal scaffoldings. / Jones, Matthew C.; Rueggeberg, Frederick; Cunningham, Aaron J.; Faircloth, Hunter Allen; Jana, Tanima; Mettenburg, Donald; Waller, Jennifer L; Postma, Gregory N; Weinberger, Paul M.

In: Laryngoscope, Vol. 125, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. E16-E22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jones, Matthew C. ; Rueggeberg, Frederick ; Cunningham, Aaron J. ; Faircloth, Hunter Allen ; Jana, Tanima ; Mettenburg, Donald ; Waller, Jennifer L ; Postma, Gregory N ; Weinberger, Paul M. / Biomechanical changes from long-term freezer storage and cellular reduction of tracheal scaffoldings. In: Laryngoscope. 2015 ; Vol. 125, No. 1. pp. E16-E22.
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abstract = "Objectives/Hypothesis: To determine structural biomechanical changes in tracheal scaffolds resulting from cellular reduction and storage at 280°C.Study Design: Laboratory-based study.Methods: Forty-four rabbit tracheal segments were separated into four treatment groups: untreated (group A, control), cellular-reduced (group B), storage at 280°C followed by cellular reduction (group C), and cellular-reduced followed by storage at 280°C (group D). Tracheal segments were subjected to uniaxial tension (n521) or compression (n523) using a universal testing machine to determine sutured tensile yield load and radial compressive strengths at 50{\%} lumen occlusion. Mean differences among groups for tension and compression were compared by analysis of variance with post-hoc Tukey-Kramer test.Results: The untreated trachea (group A) demonstrated mean yield strength of 5.93 (± 1.65) N and compressive strength of 2.10 (± 0.51) N. Following treatment/storage, the tensile yield strength was not impaired (group B56.79 [± 1.58] N, C56.21 [± 1.40] N, D56.26 [± 1.18]; P>0.10 each). Following cellular reduction, there was a significant reduction in compressive strength (group B50.44 N [± 0.13], P<0.0001), but no further reduction due to storage (group C50.39 N [± 0.10]; P50.97 compared to group B).Conclusion: The data suggest cellular reduction leads to loss of compressive strength. Freezing at -80°C (either before, or subsequent to cellular reduction) may be a viable storage method for tracheal grafts.",
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AU - Jones, Matthew C.

AU - Rueggeberg, Frederick

AU - Cunningham, Aaron J.

AU - Faircloth, Hunter Allen

AU - Jana, Tanima

AU - Mettenburg, Donald

AU - Waller, Jennifer L

AU - Postma, Gregory N

AU - Weinberger, Paul M.

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N2 - Objectives/Hypothesis: To determine structural biomechanical changes in tracheal scaffolds resulting from cellular reduction and storage at 280°C.Study Design: Laboratory-based study.Methods: Forty-four rabbit tracheal segments were separated into four treatment groups: untreated (group A, control), cellular-reduced (group B), storage at 280°C followed by cellular reduction (group C), and cellular-reduced followed by storage at 280°C (group D). Tracheal segments were subjected to uniaxial tension (n521) or compression (n523) using a universal testing machine to determine sutured tensile yield load and radial compressive strengths at 50% lumen occlusion. Mean differences among groups for tension and compression were compared by analysis of variance with post-hoc Tukey-Kramer test.Results: The untreated trachea (group A) demonstrated mean yield strength of 5.93 (± 1.65) N and compressive strength of 2.10 (± 0.51) N. Following treatment/storage, the tensile yield strength was not impaired (group B56.79 [± 1.58] N, C56.21 [± 1.40] N, D56.26 [± 1.18]; P>0.10 each). Following cellular reduction, there was a significant reduction in compressive strength (group B50.44 N [± 0.13], P<0.0001), but no further reduction due to storage (group C50.39 N [± 0.10]; P50.97 compared to group B).Conclusion: The data suggest cellular reduction leads to loss of compressive strength. Freezing at -80°C (either before, or subsequent to cellular reduction) may be a viable storage method for tracheal grafts.

AB - Objectives/Hypothesis: To determine structural biomechanical changes in tracheal scaffolds resulting from cellular reduction and storage at 280°C.Study Design: Laboratory-based study.Methods: Forty-four rabbit tracheal segments were separated into four treatment groups: untreated (group A, control), cellular-reduced (group B), storage at 280°C followed by cellular reduction (group C), and cellular-reduced followed by storage at 280°C (group D). Tracheal segments were subjected to uniaxial tension (n521) or compression (n523) using a universal testing machine to determine sutured tensile yield load and radial compressive strengths at 50% lumen occlusion. Mean differences among groups for tension and compression were compared by analysis of variance with post-hoc Tukey-Kramer test.Results: The untreated trachea (group A) demonstrated mean yield strength of 5.93 (± 1.65) N and compressive strength of 2.10 (± 0.51) N. Following treatment/storage, the tensile yield strength was not impaired (group B56.79 [± 1.58] N, C56.21 [± 1.40] N, D56.26 [± 1.18]; P>0.10 each). Following cellular reduction, there was a significant reduction in compressive strength (group B50.44 N [± 0.13], P<0.0001), but no further reduction due to storage (group C50.39 N [± 0.10]; P50.97 compared to group B).Conclusion: The data suggest cellular reduction leads to loss of compressive strength. Freezing at -80°C (either before, or subsequent to cellular reduction) may be a viable storage method for tracheal grafts.

KW - Allograft

KW - Mechanical phenomena

KW - Tensile strength

KW - Tissue engineering

KW - Tissue transplantation

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