Biomechanics of the canine mandible during bone transport distraction osteogenesis

Uriel Zapata, Paul C. Dechow, Ikuya Watanabe, Mohammed Elsayed Elsalanty, Lynne A. Opperman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study compared biomechanical patterns between finite element models (FEMs) and a fresh dog mandible tested under molar and incisal physiological loads in order to clarify the effect of the bone transport distraction osteogenesis (BTDO) surgical process. Three FEMs of dog mandibles were built in order to evaluate the effects of BTDO. The first model evaluated the mandibular response under two physiological loads resembling bite processes. In the second model, a 5.0 cm bone defect was bridged with a bone transport reconstruction plate (BTRP). In the third model, new regenerated bony tissue was incorporated within the defect to mimic the surgical process without the presence of the device. Complementarily, a mandible of a male American foxhound dog was mechanically tested in the laboratory both in the presence and absence of a BTRP, and mechanical responses were measured by attaching rosettes to the bone surface of the mandible to validate the FEM predictions. The relationship between real and predicted values indicates that the stress patterns calculated using FEM are a valid predictor of the biomechanics of the BTDO procedures. The present study provides an interesting correlation between the stiffness of the device and the biomechanical response of the mandible affected for bone transport.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number111011
JournalJournal of Biomechanical Engineering
Volume136
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

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Distraction Osteogenesis
Biomechanics
Mandible
Biomechanical Phenomena
Canidae
Bone
Bone and Bones
Dogs
Equipment and Supplies
Defects
Bites and Stings
Stiffness
Tissue

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Biomechanics of the canine mandible during bone transport distraction osteogenesis. / Zapata, Uriel; Dechow, Paul C.; Watanabe, Ikuya; Elsalanty, Mohammed Elsayed; Opperman, Lynne A.

In: Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, Vol. 136, No. 11, 111011, 01.11.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zapata, Uriel ; Dechow, Paul C. ; Watanabe, Ikuya ; Elsalanty, Mohammed Elsayed ; Opperman, Lynne A. / Biomechanics of the canine mandible during bone transport distraction osteogenesis. In: Journal of Biomechanical Engineering. 2014 ; Vol. 136, No. 11.
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