Blast-related mild traumatic brain injury in the acute phase: Acute stress reactions partially mediate the relationship between loss of consciousness and symptoms

Jacob N. Norris, Richard Woodville Sams, Peter Lundblad, Earl Frantz, Erica Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Primary objective: The objective was to compare symptoms in service members diagnosed with a blast-related mTBI (mild traumatic brain injury) with a loss of consciousness (LOC) to those without LOC. Research design: Clinicians saw US military personnel within 72 hours of sustaining a blast-related mTBI and at a follow-up visit 48-72 hours later (n = 210). Methods and procedures: Demographics, post-concussive symptoms, diagnosis of acute stress reaction (ASR) and simple reaction time data from the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metric (ANAM) were collected. Main outcomes and results: ASRs were significantly more likely in patients reporting LOC versus patients reporting no LOC. At the first post-injury visit, LOC was associated with difficulty sleeping, hearing loss, memory problems and reporting more symptoms. A follow-up analysis explored if symptomatic differences were influenced by ASR. Adjusting for ASR, the statistical relationships between LOC and symptoms were weaker (i.e. reduced Odds Ratios). At the follow-up visit, difficulty sleeping was associated with LOC before and after adjusting for ASR. Patients with both ASR and LOC had the slowest simple reaction times. Conclusions: Results suggest ASR may partially mediate symptom presentation and cognitive dysfunction in the acute phase following blast-related mTBI. Future research is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1052-1062
Number of pages11
JournalBrain Injury
Volume28
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Brain Concussion
Acute-Phase Reaction
Unconsciousness
Reaction Time
Post-Concussion Syndrome
Blast Crisis
Traumatic Brain Injury
Consciousness
Military Personnel
Hearing Loss
Research Design
Odds Ratio
Demography

Keywords

  • Acute stress
  • Blast-injury
  • Combat
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Mild traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Blast-related mild traumatic brain injury in the acute phase : Acute stress reactions partially mediate the relationship between loss of consciousness and symptoms. / Norris, Jacob N.; Sams, Richard Woodville; Lundblad, Peter; Frantz, Earl; Harris, Erica.

In: Brain Injury, Vol. 28, No. 8, 01.01.2014, p. 1052-1062.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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