Blast-related mild traumatic brain injury in the acute phase

Acute stress reactions partially mediate the relationship between loss of consciousness and symptoms

Jacob N. Norris, Richard Woodville Sams, Peter Lundblad, Earl Frantz, Erica Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Primary objective: The objective was to compare symptoms in service members diagnosed with a blast-related mTBI (mild traumatic brain injury) with a loss of consciousness (LOC) to those without LOC. Research design: Clinicians saw US military personnel within 72 hours of sustaining a blast-related mTBI and at a follow-up visit 48-72 hours later (n = 210). Methods and procedures: Demographics, post-concussive symptoms, diagnosis of acute stress reaction (ASR) and simple reaction time data from the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metric (ANAM) were collected. Main outcomes and results: ASRs were significantly more likely in patients reporting LOC versus patients reporting no LOC. At the first post-injury visit, LOC was associated with difficulty sleeping, hearing loss, memory problems and reporting more symptoms. A follow-up analysis explored if symptomatic differences were influenced by ASR. Adjusting for ASR, the statistical relationships between LOC and symptoms were weaker (i.e. reduced Odds Ratios). At the follow-up visit, difficulty sleeping was associated with LOC before and after adjusting for ASR. Patients with both ASR and LOC had the slowest simple reaction times. Conclusions: Results suggest ASR may partially mediate symptom presentation and cognitive dysfunction in the acute phase following blast-related mTBI. Future research is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1052-1062
Number of pages11
JournalBrain Injury
Volume28
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Brain Concussion
Acute-Phase Reaction
Unconsciousness
Reaction Time
Post-Concussion Syndrome
Blast Crisis
Traumatic Brain Injury
Consciousness
Military Personnel
Hearing Loss
Research Design
Odds Ratio
Demography

Keywords

  • Acute stress
  • Blast-injury
  • Combat
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Mild traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Blast-related mild traumatic brain injury in the acute phase : Acute stress reactions partially mediate the relationship between loss of consciousness and symptoms. / Norris, Jacob N.; Sams, Richard Woodville; Lundblad, Peter; Frantz, Earl; Harris, Erica.

In: Brain Injury, Vol. 28, No. 8, 01.01.2014, p. 1052-1062.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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