Blue light generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) differentially in tumor vs. normal epithelial cells

Daniel B. Lockwood, John C. Wataha, Jill B. Lewis, Wan Y. Tseng, Regina L.W. Messer, Stephen D. Hsu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

The use of blue light of high intensity in dentistry to activate polymerization of resin restorative materials was analyzed. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were estimated using dihydrofluorescein diacetate (HFLUOR-DA), a vital fluorescein-based redox sensitive dye. It was found that if the biological effects of blue light are redox-mediated, antioxidants might be used to mitigate unwanted side effects of blue light during clinical use. Dose-dependent ROS levels were generated in NHEK and OSC2 cells. It was also found that both vitamin E and NAC significantly reduced blue-light-induced levels of ROS, and were more effective in the OSC2 cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)683-688
Number of pages6
JournalDental Materials
Volume21
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2005

Keywords

  • Antioxidants
  • Epithelium
  • Fluorescein
  • ROS
  • Vitamin E

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Dentistry(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials

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