BMAL1 and CLOCK, two essential components of the circadian clock, are involved in glucose homeostasis

Radu Daniel Rudic, Peter McNamara, Anne Maria Curtis, Raymond C. Boston, Satchidananda Panda, John B. Hogenesch, Garret A. FitzGerald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

641 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Circadian timing is generated through a unique series of autoregulatory interactions termed the molecular clock. Behavioral rhythms subject to the molecular clock are well characterized. We demonstrate a role for Bmal1 and Clock in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Inactivation of the known clock components Bmal1 (Mop3) and Clock suppress the diurnal variation in glucose and triglycerides. Gluconeogenesis is abolished by deletion of Bmal1 and is depressed in Clock mutants, but the counterregulatory response of corticosterone and glucagon to insulin-induced hypoglycaemia is retained. Furthermore, a high-fat diet modulates carbohydrate metabolism by amplifying circadian variation in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, and mutation of Clock restores the chow-fed phenotype. Bmal1 and Clock, genes that function in the core molecular clock, exert profound control over recovery from insulin-induced hypoglycaemia. Furthermore, asynchronous dietary cues may modify glucose homeostasis via their interactions with peripheral molecular clocks. Copyright:

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPLoS Biology
Volume2
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2004

Fingerprint

Circadian Clocks
circadian rhythm
Clocks
homeostasis
Homeostasis
hypoglycemia
Glucose
glucose
insulin
Hypoglycemia
gluconeogenesis
glucagon
corticosterone
glucose tolerance
carbohydrate metabolism
Insulin
high fat diet
diurnal variation
insulin resistance
Gluconeogenesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Rudic, R. D., McNamara, P., Curtis, A. M., Boston, R. C., Panda, S., Hogenesch, J. B., & FitzGerald, G. A. (2004). BMAL1 and CLOCK, two essential components of the circadian clock, are involved in glucose homeostasis. PLoS Biology, 2(11). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.0020377

BMAL1 and CLOCK, two essential components of the circadian clock, are involved in glucose homeostasis. / Rudic, Radu Daniel; McNamara, Peter; Curtis, Anne Maria; Boston, Raymond C.; Panda, Satchidananda; Hogenesch, John B.; FitzGerald, Garret A.

In: PLoS Biology, Vol. 2, No. 11, 01.11.2004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rudic, Radu Daniel ; McNamara, Peter ; Curtis, Anne Maria ; Boston, Raymond C. ; Panda, Satchidananda ; Hogenesch, John B. ; FitzGerald, Garret A. / BMAL1 and CLOCK, two essential components of the circadian clock, are involved in glucose homeostasis. In: PLoS Biology. 2004 ; Vol. 2, No. 11.
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