Brain injury and repair after intracerebral hemorrhage: The role of microglia and brain-infiltrating macrophages

Rajaneekar Dasari, Frederick Bonsack, Sangeetha Sukumari-Ramesh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a major public health problem characterized by cerebral bleeding. Despite recent advances in preclinical studies, there is no effective treatment for ICH making it the deadliest subtype of stroke. The lack of effective treatment options partly attributes to the complexity as well as poorly defined pathophysiology of ICH. The emerging evidence indicates the potential of targeting secondary brain damage and hematoma resolution for improving neurological outcomes after ICH. Herein, we provide an overview of our understanding of the functional roles of activated microglia and brain-infiltrating monocyte-derived macrophages in brain injury and repair after ICH. The clinical and preclinical aspects that we discuss in this manuscript are related to ICH that occurs in adults, but not in infants. Also, we attempt to identify the knowledge gap in the field for future functional studies given the potential of targeting microglia and brain-infiltrating macrophages for therapeutic intervention after ICH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number104923
JournalNeurochemistry International
Volume142
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Brain injury
  • Intracerebral hemorrhage
  • Macrophages
  • Microglia
  • Repair

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Cell Biology

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