Breast and cervical cancer screening among migrant and seasonal farmworkers: A review

Steven Scott Coughlin, Katherine M. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Women constitute about one in five hired farmworkers in the US. Their health may be affected by exposure to unhealthy living and working conditions, by increased exposure to health hazards, by poverty, and by poor utilization of health care and preventive services. About 69% of migrant and seasonal farmworkers were born outside the US, mostly in Mexico and central America, and many speak little English. The health concerns of women who are migrant and seasonal farmworkers include breast and cervical cancer, which can be prevented or controlled through routine screening, but cancer incidence and mortality data for migrant workers are sparse. We reviewed published studies that examined breast and cervical cancer screening in this population. These studies include cross-sectional surveys, health needs assessments, and randomized and non-randomized intervention trials. A review of published studies of cancer screening among women who are migrant and seasonal farmworkers indicates that underutilization of mammograms and Papanicolau (Pap) tests among this population may stem from their limited awareness of the importance of cancer screening and cultural beliefs. Other barriers include cost, lack of health insurance, lack of transportation and child care difficulties. The extent to which results obtained in selected localities are generalizable to other settings is uncertain, but results to date provide important information about possible approaches for increasing cancer screening among women migrant farmworkers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)203-209
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Detection and Prevention
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Early Detection of Cancer
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Breast Neoplasms
Health
Preventive Health Services
Central America
Needs Assessment
Social Conditions
Women's Health
Poverty
Health Insurance
Child Care
Mexico
Population
Cross-Sectional Studies
Farmers
Costs and Cost Analysis
Mortality
Incidence

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Cervical cancer
  • Farming
  • Hispanics
  • Mammography
  • Migrant health
  • Papanicolau test
  • Prevention
  • Screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Breast and cervical cancer screening among migrant and seasonal farmworkers : A review. / Coughlin, Steven Scott; Wilson, Katherine M.

In: Cancer Detection and Prevention, Vol. 26, No. 3, 01.12.2002, p. 203-209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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