Breast and cervical cancer screening practices among Asian and Pacific Islander women in the United States, 1994-1997

Steven S. Coughlin, Robert J. Uhler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent studies suggest that Asian and Pacific Islander women in the United States may underuse cancer screening tests. We examined the breast and cervical cancer screening practices of 6048 Asian and Pacific Islander women in 49 states from 1994 through 1997 using data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. About 71.7% [95% confidence interval (CI), 66.3- 77.0%] of women in this sample aged ≥50 years had a mammogram in the past 2 years, and 69.5% (95% CI, 63.9-75.1%) had a clinical breast exam in the past 2 years. About 73.7% (95% CI, 71.3-76.0%) of women aged ≥18 years who had not undergone a hysterectomy had a Papanicolaou test in the past 3 years. Women with health insurance and those who had seen a physician in the past year were more likely to have been screened. These results underscore the need for continued efforts to ensure that Asian and Pacific Islander women who are medically underserved, including those without health insurance, have access to cancer screening services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)597-603
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume9
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

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