Buprenorphine adoption in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network

Hannah K. Knudsen, Amanda J. Abraham, J. Aaron Johnson, Paul M. Roman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

42 Scopus citations

Abstract

The National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN), a collaborative federal research initiative that brings together universities and community-based treatment programs (CTPs), has conducted multiple clinical trials of buprenorphine for opioid dependence. Part of the CTN's mission is to promote the adoption of evidence-based treatment technologies. Drawing on a data collected during face-to-face interviews with administrators from a panel of 206 CTPs, this research examines the adoption of buprenorphine over a 2-year period. These data indicated that the adoption of buprenorphine doubled between the baseline and 24-month follow-up interviews. Involvement in a buprenorphine protocol continued to be a strong predictor of adoption at the 2-year follow-up, although adoption of buprenorphine tripled among those CTPs without buprenorphine-specific protocol experience. For-profit CTPs and those offering inpatient detoxification services were more likely to adopt buprenorphine over time. A small percentage of programs discontinued using buprenorphine. These findings point to the dynamic nature of service delivery in community-based addiction treatment and the continued need for longitudinal studies of organizational change.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)307-312
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Substance Abuse Treatment
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2009

Keywords

  • Adoption of innovations
  • Buprenorphine
  • Clinical Trials Network
  • Health services research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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