Burden of cervical cancer in the United States, 1998-2003

Meg Watson, Mona Saraiya, Vicki Benard, Steven Scott Coughlin, Lisa Flowers, Vilma Cokkinides, Molly Schwenn, Youjie Huang, Anna Giuliano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

177 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND. Recent interest in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers and the availability of several years of data covering 83% of the US population prompted this descriptive assessment of cervical cancer incidence and mortality in the US during the years 1998 through 2003. This article provides a baseline for monitoring the impact of the HPV vaccine on the burden of cervical cancer over time. METHODS. Data from 2 federal cancer surveillance programs, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)'s National Program of Cancer Registries and the National Cancer Institiute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, were used to examine cervical cancer incidence by race, Hispanic ethnicity, histology, stage, and US census region. Data from the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics were used to examine cervical cancer mortality by race, Hispanic ethnicity, and US census region. RESULTS. The incidence rate of invasive cervical cancer was 8.9 per 100,000 women during 1998 through 2003. Greater than 70% of all cervical carcinomas were squamous cell type, and nearly 20% were adenocarcinomas. Cervical carcinoma incidence rates were increased for black women compared with white women and for Hispanic women compared with non-Hispanic women. Hispanic women had increased rates of adenocarcinomas compared with non-Hispanic women. The South had increased incidence and mortality rates compared with the Northeast. CONCLUSIONS. Disparities by race/ethnicity and region persist in the burden of cervical cancer in the US. Comprehensive screening and vaccination programs, as well as improved surveillance, will be essential if this burden is to be reduced in the future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2855-2864
Number of pages10
JournalCancer
Volume113
Issue number10 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2008

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Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Hispanic Americans
Incidence
Censuses
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Mortality
Neoplasms
Adenocarcinoma
SEER Program
National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.)
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Registries
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Histology
Vaccination
Carcinoma
Population

Keywords

  • Cervical cancer
  • Human papillomavirus
  • Human papillomavirus vaccine
  • Surveillance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Watson, M., Saraiya, M., Benard, V., Coughlin, S. S., Flowers, L., Cokkinides, V., ... Giuliano, A. (2008). Burden of cervical cancer in the United States, 1998-2003. Cancer, 113(10 SUPPL.), 2855-2864. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.23756

Burden of cervical cancer in the United States, 1998-2003. / Watson, Meg; Saraiya, Mona; Benard, Vicki; Coughlin, Steven Scott; Flowers, Lisa; Cokkinides, Vilma; Schwenn, Molly; Huang, Youjie; Giuliano, Anna.

In: Cancer, Vol. 113, No. 10 SUPPL., 15.11.2008, p. 2855-2864.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Watson, M, Saraiya, M, Benard, V, Coughlin, SS, Flowers, L, Cokkinides, V, Schwenn, M, Huang, Y & Giuliano, A 2008, 'Burden of cervical cancer in the United States, 1998-2003', Cancer, vol. 113, no. 10 SUPPL., pp. 2855-2864. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.23756
Watson M, Saraiya M, Benard V, Coughlin SS, Flowers L, Cokkinides V et al. Burden of cervical cancer in the United States, 1998-2003. Cancer. 2008 Nov 15;113(10 SUPPL.):2855-2864. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.23756
Watson, Meg ; Saraiya, Mona ; Benard, Vicki ; Coughlin, Steven Scott ; Flowers, Lisa ; Cokkinides, Vilma ; Schwenn, Molly ; Huang, Youjie ; Giuliano, Anna. / Burden of cervical cancer in the United States, 1998-2003. In: Cancer. 2008 ; Vol. 113, No. 10 SUPPL. pp. 2855-2864.
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