Burden of potentially human papillomavirus-associated cancers of the oropharynx and oral cavity in the US, 1998-2003

A. Blythe Ryerson, Edward S. Peters, Steven Scott Coughlin, Vivien W. Chen, Maura L. Gillison, Marsha E. Reichman, Xiaocheng Wu, Anil K. Chaturvedi, Kelly Kawaoka

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Abstract

BACKGROUND. As human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination becomes widely available in the US for cervical cancer prevention, it may also affect the rates of other cancers potentially associated with HPV. The objective of the current study was to describe the incidence rates of oropharyngeal and oral cavity cancers in the US with a focus on anatomic sites potentially associated with HPV infection. METHODS. Incident cases diagnosed between 1998 and 2003 identified through 39 population-based registries that participate in the National Program of Cancer Registries and/or the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program were examined. The incidence rates of potentially HPV-associated oropharyngeal and oral cavity cancers by various characteristics were estimated. The 1998 through 2003 trends in these rates were also compared with rates for sites not previously shown to be associated with HPV (comparison sites). RESULTS. In all, 44,160 cases of potentially HPV-associated cancers of the oropharynx and oral cavity were identified, including 19,239 (43.6%) tonsillar, 16,964 (38.4%) base of tongue, and 7957 (18.0%) other oropharyngeal cancers. The incidence rates for these sites were highest among blacks, and higher among non-Hispanics and men than among Hispanics and women. The annual incidence rates of potentially HPV-associated cancers of the tonsil and base of tongue both increased significantly from 1998 through 2003 (annual percentage change [APC], 3.0; P<.05 for both sites), whereas the incidence rates of cancer at the comparison sites generally decreased. CONCLUSIONS. The results of the current study provide baseline incidence rates of potentially HPV-associated cancers of the oropharynx and oral cavity that can be compared with rates after the widespread implementation of the HPV vaccination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2901-2909
Number of pages9
JournalCancer
Volume113
Issue number10 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2008

Fingerprint

Oropharyngeal Neoplasms
Mouth Neoplasms
Mouth
Incidence
Tongue
Registries
Tonsillar Neoplasms
Vaccination
SEER Program
Neoplasms
Papillomavirus Infections
Hispanic Americans
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Human papillomavirus
  • Oral cancer
  • Oropharyngeal cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Ryerson, A. B., Peters, E. S., Coughlin, S. S., Chen, V. W., Gillison, M. L., Reichman, M. E., ... Kawaoka, K. (2008). Burden of potentially human papillomavirus-associated cancers of the oropharynx and oral cavity in the US, 1998-2003. Cancer, 113(10 SUPPL.), 2901-2909. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.23745

Burden of potentially human papillomavirus-associated cancers of the oropharynx and oral cavity in the US, 1998-2003. / Ryerson, A. Blythe; Peters, Edward S.; Coughlin, Steven Scott; Chen, Vivien W.; Gillison, Maura L.; Reichman, Marsha E.; Wu, Xiaocheng; Chaturvedi, Anil K.; Kawaoka, Kelly.

In: Cancer, Vol. 113, No. 10 SUPPL., 15.11.2008, p. 2901-2909.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ryerson, AB, Peters, ES, Coughlin, SS, Chen, VW, Gillison, ML, Reichman, ME, Wu, X, Chaturvedi, AK & Kawaoka, K 2008, 'Burden of potentially human papillomavirus-associated cancers of the oropharynx and oral cavity in the US, 1998-2003', Cancer, vol. 113, no. 10 SUPPL., pp. 2901-2909. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.23745
Ryerson, A. Blythe ; Peters, Edward S. ; Coughlin, Steven Scott ; Chen, Vivien W. ; Gillison, Maura L. ; Reichman, Marsha E. ; Wu, Xiaocheng ; Chaturvedi, Anil K. ; Kawaoka, Kelly. / Burden of potentially human papillomavirus-associated cancers of the oropharynx and oral cavity in the US, 1998-2003. In: Cancer. 2008 ; Vol. 113, No. 10 SUPPL. pp. 2901-2909.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND. As human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination becomes widely available in the US for cervical cancer prevention, it may also affect the rates of other cancers potentially associated with HPV. The objective of the current study was to describe the incidence rates of oropharyngeal and oral cavity cancers in the US with a focus on anatomic sites potentially associated with HPV infection. METHODS. Incident cases diagnosed between 1998 and 2003 identified through 39 population-based registries that participate in the National Program of Cancer Registries and/or the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program were examined. The incidence rates of potentially HPV-associated oropharyngeal and oral cavity cancers by various characteristics were estimated. The 1998 through 2003 trends in these rates were also compared with rates for sites not previously shown to be associated with HPV (comparison sites). RESULTS. In all, 44,160 cases of potentially HPV-associated cancers of the oropharynx and oral cavity were identified, including 19,239 (43.6{\%}) tonsillar, 16,964 (38.4{\%}) base of tongue, and 7957 (18.0{\%}) other oropharyngeal cancers. The incidence rates for these sites were highest among blacks, and higher among non-Hispanics and men than among Hispanics and women. The annual incidence rates of potentially HPV-associated cancers of the tonsil and base of tongue both increased significantly from 1998 through 2003 (annual percentage change [APC], 3.0; P<.05 for both sites), whereas the incidence rates of cancer at the comparison sites generally decreased. CONCLUSIONS. The results of the current study provide baseline incidence rates of potentially HPV-associated cancers of the oropharynx and oral cavity that can be compared with rates after the widespread implementation of the HPV vaccination.",
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AU - Ryerson, A. Blythe

AU - Peters, Edward S.

AU - Coughlin, Steven Scott

AU - Chen, Vivien W.

AU - Gillison, Maura L.

AU - Reichman, Marsha E.

AU - Wu, Xiaocheng

AU - Chaturvedi, Anil K.

AU - Kawaoka, Kelly

PY - 2008/11/15

Y1 - 2008/11/15

N2 - BACKGROUND. As human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination becomes widely available in the US for cervical cancer prevention, it may also affect the rates of other cancers potentially associated with HPV. The objective of the current study was to describe the incidence rates of oropharyngeal and oral cavity cancers in the US with a focus on anatomic sites potentially associated with HPV infection. METHODS. Incident cases diagnosed between 1998 and 2003 identified through 39 population-based registries that participate in the National Program of Cancer Registries and/or the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program were examined. The incidence rates of potentially HPV-associated oropharyngeal and oral cavity cancers by various characteristics were estimated. The 1998 through 2003 trends in these rates were also compared with rates for sites not previously shown to be associated with HPV (comparison sites). RESULTS. In all, 44,160 cases of potentially HPV-associated cancers of the oropharynx and oral cavity were identified, including 19,239 (43.6%) tonsillar, 16,964 (38.4%) base of tongue, and 7957 (18.0%) other oropharyngeal cancers. The incidence rates for these sites were highest among blacks, and higher among non-Hispanics and men than among Hispanics and women. The annual incidence rates of potentially HPV-associated cancers of the tonsil and base of tongue both increased significantly from 1998 through 2003 (annual percentage change [APC], 3.0; P<.05 for both sites), whereas the incidence rates of cancer at the comparison sites generally decreased. CONCLUSIONS. The results of the current study provide baseline incidence rates of potentially HPV-associated cancers of the oropharynx and oral cavity that can be compared with rates after the widespread implementation of the HPV vaccination.

AB - BACKGROUND. As human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination becomes widely available in the US for cervical cancer prevention, it may also affect the rates of other cancers potentially associated with HPV. The objective of the current study was to describe the incidence rates of oropharyngeal and oral cavity cancers in the US with a focus on anatomic sites potentially associated with HPV infection. METHODS. Incident cases diagnosed between 1998 and 2003 identified through 39 population-based registries that participate in the National Program of Cancer Registries and/or the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program were examined. The incidence rates of potentially HPV-associated oropharyngeal and oral cavity cancers by various characteristics were estimated. The 1998 through 2003 trends in these rates were also compared with rates for sites not previously shown to be associated with HPV (comparison sites). RESULTS. In all, 44,160 cases of potentially HPV-associated cancers of the oropharynx and oral cavity were identified, including 19,239 (43.6%) tonsillar, 16,964 (38.4%) base of tongue, and 7957 (18.0%) other oropharyngeal cancers. The incidence rates for these sites were highest among blacks, and higher among non-Hispanics and men than among Hispanics and women. The annual incidence rates of potentially HPV-associated cancers of the tonsil and base of tongue both increased significantly from 1998 through 2003 (annual percentage change [APC], 3.0; P<.05 for both sites), whereas the incidence rates of cancer at the comparison sites generally decreased. CONCLUSIONS. The results of the current study provide baseline incidence rates of potentially HPV-associated cancers of the oropharynx and oral cavity that can be compared with rates after the widespread implementation of the HPV vaccination.

KW - Cancer

KW - Human papillomavirus

KW - Oral cancer

KW - Oropharyngeal cancer

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