Can independent coronal multiplanar reformatted images obtained using state-of-the-art MDCT scanners be used for primary interpretation of MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis? A feasibility study

Sunit Sebastian, Mannudeep K. Kalra, Pardeep Kumar Mittal, Sanjay Saini, William C. Small

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate if coronal reformatted images can be used for primary interpretation of MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis using 64-slice MDCT. Materials and methods: IRB approval was obtained. We reviewed MDCT studies of the abdomen and pelvis of 220 consecutive patients performed with 64 row MDCT with constant scanning parameters. Based on a 0.625 mm raw data set, transverse images were reconstructed at 5 mm and coronal images at 3 mm using standard reconstruction algorithms. Reader familiarity was achieved by simultaneous evaluation of transverse and coronal reformats in an initial group of 20 separate cases for findings in consensus. Two subsequent phases of image analysis were then performed in two groups of 100 patients each. In the first phase two radiologists evaluated the added utility of simultaneous review of MDCT of transverse and coronal reformatted images over transverse images alone in 100 consecutive patients referred for MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis. In the second phase, the same radiologists evaluated whether coronal multiplanar reformats could be used for primary interpretation of MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis in a separate but similar cohort of 100 consecutive abdominopelvic MDCT studies. The number of lesion(s), their location, size of smallest lesion, presence of artifacts and likely diagnosis were noted at each image interpretation. Image quality and confidence for interpretation was evaluated using five-point and three-point scale, respectively. The time required for primary interpretation of coronal reformats and transverse images were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: Both readers detected additional findings (n = 37, 35), respectively, on simultaneous review of transverse and coronal reformats as compared with transverse images alone (p < 0.001). Excellent interobserver agreement was noted (r = 0.94-0.96). Both readers detected additional findings (n = 62, 53), respectively, on independent review of coronal reformats as compared with transverse images alone (p < 0.001). Readers' confidence was also found to be higher on coronal evaluations as compared to axial images (p < 0.01). There was good interobserver agreement between the two readers. Conclusion: Independent coronal multiplanar reformatted images obtained using state-of-the-art MDCT scanners show promise as the preferred orientation and can be useful for primary interpretation of MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)439-446
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Radiology
Volume64
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

Fingerprint

Feasibility Studies
Pelvis
Abdomen
Research Ethics Committees
Nonparametric Statistics
Artifacts
Consensus
Radiologists

Keywords

  • 64-Slice MDCT
  • Coronal reformats
  • Primary interpretation
  • Transverse images

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Can independent coronal multiplanar reformatted images obtained using state-of-the-art MDCT scanners be used for primary interpretation of MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis? A feasibility study. / Sebastian, Sunit; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Mittal, Pardeep Kumar; Saini, Sanjay; Small, William C.

In: European Journal of Radiology, Vol. 64, No. 3, 01.12.2007, p. 439-446.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{385704bdf6d44811afbc3b55dbdd4d54,
title = "Can independent coronal multiplanar reformatted images obtained using state-of-the-art MDCT scanners be used for primary interpretation of MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis? A feasibility study",
abstract = "Purpose: To evaluate if coronal reformatted images can be used for primary interpretation of MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis using 64-slice MDCT. Materials and methods: IRB approval was obtained. We reviewed MDCT studies of the abdomen and pelvis of 220 consecutive patients performed with 64 row MDCT with constant scanning parameters. Based on a 0.625 mm raw data set, transverse images were reconstructed at 5 mm and coronal images at 3 mm using standard reconstruction algorithms. Reader familiarity was achieved by simultaneous evaluation of transverse and coronal reformats in an initial group of 20 separate cases for findings in consensus. Two subsequent phases of image analysis were then performed in two groups of 100 patients each. In the first phase two radiologists evaluated the added utility of simultaneous review of MDCT of transverse and coronal reformatted images over transverse images alone in 100 consecutive patients referred for MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis. In the second phase, the same radiologists evaluated whether coronal multiplanar reformats could be used for primary interpretation of MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis in a separate but similar cohort of 100 consecutive abdominopelvic MDCT studies. The number of lesion(s), their location, size of smallest lesion, presence of artifacts and likely diagnosis were noted at each image interpretation. Image quality and confidence for interpretation was evaluated using five-point and three-point scale, respectively. The time required for primary interpretation of coronal reformats and transverse images were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: Both readers detected additional findings (n = 37, 35), respectively, on simultaneous review of transverse and coronal reformats as compared with transverse images alone (p < 0.001). Excellent interobserver agreement was noted (r = 0.94-0.96). Both readers detected additional findings (n = 62, 53), respectively, on independent review of coronal reformats as compared with transverse images alone (p < 0.001). Readers' confidence was also found to be higher on coronal evaluations as compared to axial images (p < 0.01). There was good interobserver agreement between the two readers. Conclusion: Independent coronal multiplanar reformatted images obtained using state-of-the-art MDCT scanners show promise as the preferred orientation and can be useful for primary interpretation of MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis.",
keywords = "64-Slice MDCT, Coronal reformats, Primary interpretation, Transverse images",
author = "Sunit Sebastian and Kalra, {Mannudeep K.} and Mittal, {Pardeep Kumar} and Sanjay Saini and Small, {William C.}",
year = "2007",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ejrad.2007.03.002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "64",
pages = "439--446",
journal = "Journal of Medical Imaging",
issn = "0720-048X",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Can independent coronal multiplanar reformatted images obtained using state-of-the-art MDCT scanners be used for primary interpretation of MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis? A feasibility study

AU - Sebastian, Sunit

AU - Kalra, Mannudeep K.

AU - Mittal, Pardeep Kumar

AU - Saini, Sanjay

AU - Small, William C.

PY - 2007/12/1

Y1 - 2007/12/1

N2 - Purpose: To evaluate if coronal reformatted images can be used for primary interpretation of MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis using 64-slice MDCT. Materials and methods: IRB approval was obtained. We reviewed MDCT studies of the abdomen and pelvis of 220 consecutive patients performed with 64 row MDCT with constant scanning parameters. Based on a 0.625 mm raw data set, transverse images were reconstructed at 5 mm and coronal images at 3 mm using standard reconstruction algorithms. Reader familiarity was achieved by simultaneous evaluation of transverse and coronal reformats in an initial group of 20 separate cases for findings in consensus. Two subsequent phases of image analysis were then performed in two groups of 100 patients each. In the first phase two radiologists evaluated the added utility of simultaneous review of MDCT of transverse and coronal reformatted images over transverse images alone in 100 consecutive patients referred for MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis. In the second phase, the same radiologists evaluated whether coronal multiplanar reformats could be used for primary interpretation of MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis in a separate but similar cohort of 100 consecutive abdominopelvic MDCT studies. The number of lesion(s), their location, size of smallest lesion, presence of artifacts and likely diagnosis were noted at each image interpretation. Image quality and confidence for interpretation was evaluated using five-point and three-point scale, respectively. The time required for primary interpretation of coronal reformats and transverse images were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: Both readers detected additional findings (n = 37, 35), respectively, on simultaneous review of transverse and coronal reformats as compared with transverse images alone (p < 0.001). Excellent interobserver agreement was noted (r = 0.94-0.96). Both readers detected additional findings (n = 62, 53), respectively, on independent review of coronal reformats as compared with transverse images alone (p < 0.001). Readers' confidence was also found to be higher on coronal evaluations as compared to axial images (p < 0.01). There was good interobserver agreement between the two readers. Conclusion: Independent coronal multiplanar reformatted images obtained using state-of-the-art MDCT scanners show promise as the preferred orientation and can be useful for primary interpretation of MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis.

AB - Purpose: To evaluate if coronal reformatted images can be used for primary interpretation of MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis using 64-slice MDCT. Materials and methods: IRB approval was obtained. We reviewed MDCT studies of the abdomen and pelvis of 220 consecutive patients performed with 64 row MDCT with constant scanning parameters. Based on a 0.625 mm raw data set, transverse images were reconstructed at 5 mm and coronal images at 3 mm using standard reconstruction algorithms. Reader familiarity was achieved by simultaneous evaluation of transverse and coronal reformats in an initial group of 20 separate cases for findings in consensus. Two subsequent phases of image analysis were then performed in two groups of 100 patients each. In the first phase two radiologists evaluated the added utility of simultaneous review of MDCT of transverse and coronal reformatted images over transverse images alone in 100 consecutive patients referred for MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis. In the second phase, the same radiologists evaluated whether coronal multiplanar reformats could be used for primary interpretation of MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis in a separate but similar cohort of 100 consecutive abdominopelvic MDCT studies. The number of lesion(s), their location, size of smallest lesion, presence of artifacts and likely diagnosis were noted at each image interpretation. Image quality and confidence for interpretation was evaluated using five-point and three-point scale, respectively. The time required for primary interpretation of coronal reformats and transverse images were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: Both readers detected additional findings (n = 37, 35), respectively, on simultaneous review of transverse and coronal reformats as compared with transverse images alone (p < 0.001). Excellent interobserver agreement was noted (r = 0.94-0.96). Both readers detected additional findings (n = 62, 53), respectively, on independent review of coronal reformats as compared with transverse images alone (p < 0.001). Readers' confidence was also found to be higher on coronal evaluations as compared to axial images (p < 0.01). There was good interobserver agreement between the two readers. Conclusion: Independent coronal multiplanar reformatted images obtained using state-of-the-art MDCT scanners show promise as the preferred orientation and can be useful for primary interpretation of MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis.

KW - 64-Slice MDCT

KW - Coronal reformats

KW - Primary interpretation

KW - Transverse images

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=36148968039&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=36148968039&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ejrad.2007.03.002

DO - 10.1016/j.ejrad.2007.03.002

M3 - Article

C2 - 17408899

AN - SCOPUS:36148968039

VL - 64

SP - 439

EP - 446

JO - Journal of Medical Imaging

JF - Journal of Medical Imaging

SN - 0720-048X

IS - 3

ER -