Cancer immunotherapy: moving forward with peptide T cell vaccines

Takumi Kumai, Aaron Fan, Yasuaki Harabuchi, Esteban Celis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent advances in cancer immunology, such as the discovery of immune checkpoint inhibitors, have validated immune cells as potential key players for effective cancer treatment. The efficacy of these therapies seems to be codependent on a tumor-reactive T lymphocyte response. For many years, numerous attempts and strategies in developing vaccines to generate tumor-reactive T cells have yielded poor results in the clinic due to suboptimal immunogenicity and the inability to overcome an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. In this review, we summarize past and current advances in T cell vaccines and describe our experience in developing optimized methods for antigen/adjuvant selection and vaccine administration in order to induce powerful anti-tumor responses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-63
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Immunology
Volume47
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

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Peptide T
Immunotherapy
Vaccines
T-Lymphocytes
Neoplasms
Tumor Microenvironment
Immunosuppressive Agents
Allergy and Immunology
Antigens
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Cancer immunotherapy : moving forward with peptide T cell vaccines. / Kumai, Takumi; Fan, Aaron; Harabuchi, Yasuaki; Celis, Esteban.

In: Current Opinion in Immunology, Vol. 47, 01.08.2017, p. 57-63.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Kumai, Takumi ; Fan, Aaron ; Harabuchi, Yasuaki ; Celis, Esteban. / Cancer immunotherapy : moving forward with peptide T cell vaccines. In: Current Opinion in Immunology. 2017 ; Vol. 47. pp. 57-63.
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