Cannabis Use in Individuals With Spinal Cord Injury or Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Colorado

Lenore A. Hawley, Jessica M. Ketchum, Clare Morey, Kathleen Collins, Susan Charlifue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To describe the prevalence of cannabis use in an adult sample with spinal cord injury (SCI) or traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Colorado, and to describe the self-reported reasons and side effects of cannabis use in this sample. Design: Mixed-methods observational study, using focus group data and telephone survey. Setting: Community. Participants: Colorado adults who sustained SCI or moderate to severe TBI and received services through Craig Hospital. Interventions: None. Main Outcome Measures: Survey. Results: Focus group participants identified issues that were then included in the survey development. Seventy percent of the 116 participants surveyed reported cannabis use before their injury (67% SCI, 74% TBI) and 48% reported use after their injury (53% SCI, 45% TBI). Overall, the most common reason for use was recreational (67%), followed by reducing stress/anxiety (62.5%) and improving sleep (59%). Among the respondents with SCI, the most common reasons for use were to reduce spasticity (70%), recreation (63%), and to improve sleep (63%). Among those with TBI, reasons endorsed were recreational (72%), reducing stress/anxiety (62%), and improving sleep (55%). Smoking was the most common method of use. Conclusions: A majority of this sample reported using cannabis before injury, and approximately half reported using cannabis after injury. Both groups reported recreational use, whereas the group with SCI also highly endorsed using cannabis to address chronic medical conditions. Clinicians should be aware of the high prevalence of cannabis use in these populations and the impact such use may have on the individual's medical management. Further research in this area is needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Cannabis
Spinal Cord Injuries
Sleep
Wounds and Injuries
Focus Groups
Anxiety
Recreation
Traumatic Brain Injury
Telephone
Observational Studies
Smoking
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Surveys and Questionnaires
Research
Population

Keywords

  • cannabis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Cannabis Use in Individuals With Spinal Cord Injury or Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Colorado. / Hawley, Lenore A.; Ketchum, Jessica M.; Morey, Clare; Collins, Kathleen; Charlifue, Susan.

In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hawley, Lenore A. ; Ketchum, Jessica M. ; Morey, Clare ; Collins, Kathleen ; Charlifue, Susan. / Cannabis Use in Individuals With Spinal Cord Injury or Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Colorado. In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2018.
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abstract = "Objectives: To describe the prevalence of cannabis use in an adult sample with spinal cord injury (SCI) or traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Colorado, and to describe the self-reported reasons and side effects of cannabis use in this sample. Design: Mixed-methods observational study, using focus group data and telephone survey. Setting: Community. Participants: Colorado adults who sustained SCI or moderate to severe TBI and received services through Craig Hospital. Interventions: None. Main Outcome Measures: Survey. Results: Focus group participants identified issues that were then included in the survey development. Seventy percent of the 116 participants surveyed reported cannabis use before their injury (67{\%} SCI, 74{\%} TBI) and 48{\%} reported use after their injury (53{\%} SCI, 45{\%} TBI). Overall, the most common reason for use was recreational (67{\%}), followed by reducing stress/anxiety (62.5{\%}) and improving sleep (59{\%}). Among the respondents with SCI, the most common reasons for use were to reduce spasticity (70{\%}), recreation (63{\%}), and to improve sleep (63{\%}). Among those with TBI, reasons endorsed were recreational (72{\%}), reducing stress/anxiety (62{\%}), and improving sleep (55{\%}). Smoking was the most common method of use. Conclusions: A majority of this sample reported using cannabis before injury, and approximately half reported using cannabis after injury. Both groups reported recreational use, whereas the group with SCI also highly endorsed using cannabis to address chronic medical conditions. Clinicians should be aware of the high prevalence of cannabis use in these populations and the impact such use may have on the individual's medical management. Further research in this area is needed.",
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