Carnitine deficiency revisited

James Edwin Carroll, A. L. Carter, S. Perlman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The question of why carnitine is low in various disease states remains incompletely answered. The most likely explanations center around failure of the tissue to take up or hold carnitine and increased renal loss. Many diseases exhibit variations on these two themes, and consequently, the distinction between primary and secondary carnitine deficiency syndromes is increasingly blurred. Presently, the clinician has little choice but to being a trial of carnitine therapy in situations in which the tissue carnitine concentration seems low enough to limit fatty acid oxidation. With the recognition that 'carnitine deficiency' does not constitute an etiologic diagnosis, a thorough search should be made for the biochemical lesion in each patient.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1501-1503
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume117
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987

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Carnitine
Fatty Acids
Kidney

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Carnitine deficiency revisited. / Carroll, James Edwin; Carter, A. L.; Perlman, S.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 117, No. 9, 01.01.1987, p. 1501-1503.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Carroll, JE, Carter, AL & Perlman, S 1987, 'Carnitine deficiency revisited', Journal of Nutrition, vol. 117, no. 9, pp. 1501-1503. https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/117.9.1501
Carroll, James Edwin ; Carter, A. L. ; Perlman, S. / Carnitine deficiency revisited. In: Journal of Nutrition. 1987 ; Vol. 117, No. 9. pp. 1501-1503.
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