Cat shedding of Fel d I is not reduced by washings, Allerpet-C spray, or acepromazine

Charles V. Klucka, Dennis Randall Ownby, Jack Green, Edward Zoratti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: No published studies have compared the effectiveness of several treatments proposed to reduce cat allergenicity. Cat washing studies demonstrating efficacy involved very small sample sizes or infrequent washings. Allerpet-C (Allerpet, Inc., New York, N.Y.), a widely advertised topical spray, and acepromazine, a tranquilizer advocated as efficacious in subsedating doses, have never been scientifically studied. Objective: We compared the effects of cat washing, Allerpet-C spray, and acepromazine with that of no treatment on the shedding of the primary cat allergen, Felis domesticus I by cats. Methods: In a blinded, comparative, controlled study, we measured the amounts of Fel d I shed during an 8-week treatment period with a sample of 24 female mongrel cats randomly assigned to four groups; one group received weekly distilled water washings, one received weekly Allerpet-C spray applications, one received daily oral acepromazine, and one had no treatment (control). Thirty-minute, twice-weekly air samples were collected from each cat with a laminated plastic-acrylic chamber and air sampler. Results: One-sample, two-sided t tests comparing baseline to final-week measurements revealed no significant change in Fel d I within each group (mean change ±SD: washing; 487.6 ± 1896.4 mU per 30 minutes, p = 0.63; Allerpet-C spray, 429.2 ± 871.6 mU per 30 minutes, p = 0.46 acepromazine; -620.6 ± 1031.2, p = 0.52 per 30 minutes). Furthermore, analysis of covariance revealed no significant change in Fel d I levels between groups (p = 0.72). Conclusions: Our data do not show significant reductions in Fel d I shedding as a result of any of these treatments. Therefore we cannot recommend them to patients allergic to cats. (J ALLERGY CLIN IMMUNOL 1995;95:1164-71.).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1164-1171
Number of pages8
JournalThe Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume95
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Acepromazine
Cats
Air
Therapeutics
Sample Size
Plastics

Keywords

  • Acepromazine
  • Allerpet-C spray
  • Fel d I
  • allergen shedding
  • cat
  • cat washing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Cat shedding of Fel d I is not reduced by washings, Allerpet-C spray, or acepromazine. / Klucka, Charles V.; Ownby, Dennis Randall; Green, Jack; Zoratti, Edward.

In: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 95, No. 6, 01.01.1995, p. 1164-1171.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: No published studies have compared the effectiveness of several treatments proposed to reduce cat allergenicity. Cat washing studies demonstrating efficacy involved very small sample sizes or infrequent washings. Allerpet-C (Allerpet, Inc., New York, N.Y.), a widely advertised topical spray, and acepromazine, a tranquilizer advocated as efficacious in subsedating doses, have never been scientifically studied. Objective: We compared the effects of cat washing, Allerpet-C spray, and acepromazine with that of no treatment on the shedding of the primary cat allergen, Felis domesticus I by cats. Methods: In a blinded, comparative, controlled study, we measured the amounts of Fel d I shed during an 8-week treatment period with a sample of 24 female mongrel cats randomly assigned to four groups; one group received weekly distilled water washings, one received weekly Allerpet-C spray applications, one received daily oral acepromazine, and one had no treatment (control). Thirty-minute, twice-weekly air samples were collected from each cat with a laminated plastic-acrylic chamber and air sampler. Results: One-sample, two-sided t tests comparing baseline to final-week measurements revealed no significant change in Fel d I within each group (mean change ±SD: washing; 487.6 ± 1896.4 mU per 30 minutes, p = 0.63; Allerpet-C spray, 429.2 ± 871.6 mU per 30 minutes, p = 0.46 acepromazine; -620.6 ± 1031.2, p = 0.52 per 30 minutes). Furthermore, analysis of covariance revealed no significant change in Fel d I levels between groups (p = 0.72). Conclusions: Our data do not show significant reductions in Fel d I shedding as a result of any of these treatments. Therefore we cannot recommend them to patients allergic to cats. (J ALLERGY CLIN IMMUNOL 1995;95:1164-71.).",
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AB - Background: No published studies have compared the effectiveness of several treatments proposed to reduce cat allergenicity. Cat washing studies demonstrating efficacy involved very small sample sizes or infrequent washings. Allerpet-C (Allerpet, Inc., New York, N.Y.), a widely advertised topical spray, and acepromazine, a tranquilizer advocated as efficacious in subsedating doses, have never been scientifically studied. Objective: We compared the effects of cat washing, Allerpet-C spray, and acepromazine with that of no treatment on the shedding of the primary cat allergen, Felis domesticus I by cats. Methods: In a blinded, comparative, controlled study, we measured the amounts of Fel d I shed during an 8-week treatment period with a sample of 24 female mongrel cats randomly assigned to four groups; one group received weekly distilled water washings, one received weekly Allerpet-C spray applications, one received daily oral acepromazine, and one had no treatment (control). Thirty-minute, twice-weekly air samples were collected from each cat with a laminated plastic-acrylic chamber and air sampler. Results: One-sample, two-sided t tests comparing baseline to final-week measurements revealed no significant change in Fel d I within each group (mean change ±SD: washing; 487.6 ± 1896.4 mU per 30 minutes, p = 0.63; Allerpet-C spray, 429.2 ± 871.6 mU per 30 minutes, p = 0.46 acepromazine; -620.6 ± 1031.2, p = 0.52 per 30 minutes). Furthermore, analysis of covariance revealed no significant change in Fel d I levels between groups (p = 0.72). Conclusions: Our data do not show significant reductions in Fel d I shedding as a result of any of these treatments. Therefore we cannot recommend them to patients allergic to cats. (J ALLERGY CLIN IMMUNOL 1995;95:1164-71.).

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