CDC-funded intervention research aimed at promoting colorectal cancer screening in communities

Steven Scott Coughlin, Mary E. Costanza, Maria E. Fernandez, Karen Glanz, Judith W. Lee, Selina A. Smith, Leonardo Stroud, Irene Tessaro, John M. Westfall, Joel L. Weissfeld, Daniel S. Blumenthal

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND. Although strong scientific evidence has shown that screening for colorectal cancer saves lives, most U.S. adults who are at the recommended age are not being screened. Prior studies suggest that barriers to routine screening vary by race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, urban/rural residence, health insurance status, and factors related to health care providers and the health care environment. Relatively few studies, however, have identified and tested intervention approaches to promote routine colorectal cancer screening among diverse populations. METHODS. The Division of Cancer Prevention and Control at CDC has funded ongoing projects to develop and test interventions to promote routine colorectal cancer screening among medically underserved populations in Appalachia, the Lower Rio Grande Valley in Texas, the High Plains region of Colorado, and other U.S. communities. RESULTS. This article provides an overview of colorectal cancer screening intervention studies currently funded by CDC that focus on a wide range of populations, including medically underserved persons who live in predominately rural areas, Hispanic and non-Hispanic persons, urban African Americans, persons with low health literacy, and persons enrolled in managed care organizations. CONCLUSIONS. These CDC-funded intervention research projects are likely to contribute importantly to evidence about what works to promote colorectal cancer screening in diverse U.S. communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1196-1204
Number of pages9
JournalCancer
Volume107
Issue numberSUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2006

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Early Detection of Cancer
Colorectal Neoplasms
Research
Appalachian Region
Health Literacy
Rural Health
Insurance Coverage
Managed Care Programs
Vulnerable Populations
Health Insurance
Hispanic Americans
Social Class
African Americans
Health Personnel
Population
Health Status
Organizations
Delivery of Health Care
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Cancer prevention and control
  • Colonoscopy
  • Colorectal cancer
  • FOBT
  • Hispanics
  • Rural health
  • Sigmoidoscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Coughlin, S. S., Costanza, M. E., Fernandez, M. E., Glanz, K., Lee, J. W., Smith, S. A., ... Blumenthal, D. S. (2006). CDC-funded intervention research aimed at promoting colorectal cancer screening in communities. Cancer, 107(SUPPL.), 1196-1204. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.22017

CDC-funded intervention research aimed at promoting colorectal cancer screening in communities. / Coughlin, Steven Scott; Costanza, Mary E.; Fernandez, Maria E.; Glanz, Karen; Lee, Judith W.; Smith, Selina A.; Stroud, Leonardo; Tessaro, Irene; Westfall, John M.; Weissfeld, Joel L.; Blumenthal, Daniel S.

In: Cancer, Vol. 107, No. SUPPL., 01.09.2006, p. 1196-1204.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Coughlin, SS, Costanza, ME, Fernandez, ME, Glanz, K, Lee, JW, Smith, SA, Stroud, L, Tessaro, I, Westfall, JM, Weissfeld, JL & Blumenthal, DS 2006, 'CDC-funded intervention research aimed at promoting colorectal cancer screening in communities', Cancer, vol. 107, no. SUPPL., pp. 1196-1204. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.22017
Coughlin SS, Costanza ME, Fernandez ME, Glanz K, Lee JW, Smith SA et al. CDC-funded intervention research aimed at promoting colorectal cancer screening in communities. Cancer. 2006 Sep 1;107(SUPPL.):1196-1204. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.22017
Coughlin, Steven Scott ; Costanza, Mary E. ; Fernandez, Maria E. ; Glanz, Karen ; Lee, Judith W. ; Smith, Selina A. ; Stroud, Leonardo ; Tessaro, Irene ; Westfall, John M. ; Weissfeld, Joel L. ; Blumenthal, Daniel S. / CDC-funded intervention research aimed at promoting colorectal cancer screening in communities. In: Cancer. 2006 ; Vol. 107, No. SUPPL. pp. 1196-1204.
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