Cervical cancer screening among women who gave birth in the US-Mexico border region, 2005

The brownsville-matamoros sister city project for women's health

Brian C. Castrucci, Alonso Echegollen Guzmán, Mona Saraiya, Brian R. Smith, Kayan L. Lewis, Steven Scott Coughlin, Ginger L. Gossman, Jill A. McDonald, Hillary Foulkes, Gita Mirchandani, Luz Correa Nieto Canedo, Imelda M. Garcia, Juan Acuña

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction The objective of this study was to examine correlates of ever having had a Papanicolaou (Pap) test among women who recently delivered a live infant and who resided near the US-Mexico border. Methods This cross-sectional study included women who delivered a live infant in Matamoros, Mexico (n = 488) and Cameron County, Texas (n = 453). Women were interviewed in the hospital before discharge between August 21 and November 9, 2005. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the odds of ever having had a Pap test. Results Significantly fewer Matamoros women (62.1%) than Cameron County women (95.7%) reported ever having had a Pap test. Only 12% of Matamoros women said they received their most recent Pap test during prenatal care, compared with nearly 75% of Cameron County women. After adjusting for potential confounders, the odds of ever having had a Pap test were 7.41 times greater in Cameron County than in Matamoros (95% confidence interval, 4.07-13.48). Conclusion The Healthy Border 2010 goals are to cut cervical cancer mortality by 20% to 30% in the border region. The significant difference in Pap test prevalence among our survey respondents may reflect that routine prenatal Pap testing is more common in the United States than in Mexico. Because women who are receiving prenatal care have increased interaction with health care providers, Matamoros providers may need to be educated about the need to screen for cervical cancer during this time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number63
JournalPreventing Chronic Disease
Volume5
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Women's Health
Mexico
Early Detection of Cancer
Papanicolaou Test
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Parturition
Prenatal Care
Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Confidence Intervals
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Cervical cancer screening among women who gave birth in the US-Mexico border region, 2005 : The brownsville-matamoros sister city project for women's health. / Castrucci, Brian C.; Guzmán, Alonso Echegollen; Saraiya, Mona; Smith, Brian R.; Lewis, Kayan L.; Coughlin, Steven Scott; Gossman, Ginger L.; McDonald, Jill A.; Foulkes, Hillary; Mirchandani, Gita; Canedo, Luz Correa Nieto; Garcia, Imelda M.; Acuña, Juan.

In: Preventing Chronic Disease, Vol. 5, No. 4, 63, 01.01.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Castrucci, BC, Guzmán, AE, Saraiya, M, Smith, BR, Lewis, KL, Coughlin, SS, Gossman, GL, McDonald, JA, Foulkes, H, Mirchandani, G, Canedo, LCN, Garcia, IM & Acuña, J 2008, 'Cervical cancer screening among women who gave birth in the US-Mexico border region, 2005: The brownsville-matamoros sister city project for women's health', Preventing Chronic Disease, vol. 5, no. 4, 63.
Castrucci, Brian C. ; Guzmán, Alonso Echegollen ; Saraiya, Mona ; Smith, Brian R. ; Lewis, Kayan L. ; Coughlin, Steven Scott ; Gossman, Ginger L. ; McDonald, Jill A. ; Foulkes, Hillary ; Mirchandani, Gita ; Canedo, Luz Correa Nieto ; Garcia, Imelda M. ; Acuña, Juan. / Cervical cancer screening among women who gave birth in the US-Mexico border region, 2005 : The brownsville-matamoros sister city project for women's health. In: Preventing Chronic Disease. 2008 ; Vol. 5, No. 4.
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abstract = "Introduction The objective of this study was to examine correlates of ever having had a Papanicolaou (Pap) test among women who recently delivered a live infant and who resided near the US-Mexico border. Methods This cross-sectional study included women who delivered a live infant in Matamoros, Mexico (n = 488) and Cameron County, Texas (n = 453). Women were interviewed in the hospital before discharge between August 21 and November 9, 2005. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the odds of ever having had a Pap test. Results Significantly fewer Matamoros women (62.1{\%}) than Cameron County women (95.7{\%}) reported ever having had a Pap test. Only 12{\%} of Matamoros women said they received their most recent Pap test during prenatal care, compared with nearly 75{\%} of Cameron County women. After adjusting for potential confounders, the odds of ever having had a Pap test were 7.41 times greater in Cameron County than in Matamoros (95{\%} confidence interval, 4.07-13.48). Conclusion The Healthy Border 2010 goals are to cut cervical cancer mortality by 20{\%} to 30{\%} in the border region. The significant difference in Pap test prevalence among our survey respondents may reflect that routine prenatal Pap testing is more common in the United States than in Mexico. Because women who are receiving prenatal care have increased interaction with health care providers, Matamoros providers may need to be educated about the need to screen for cervical cancer during this time.",
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AU - Guzmán, Alonso Echegollen

AU - Saraiya, Mona

AU - Smith, Brian R.

AU - Lewis, Kayan L.

AU - Coughlin, Steven Scott

AU - Gossman, Ginger L.

AU - McDonald, Jill A.

AU - Foulkes, Hillary

AU - Mirchandani, Gita

AU - Canedo, Luz Correa Nieto

AU - Garcia, Imelda M.

AU - Acuña, Juan

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N2 - Introduction The objective of this study was to examine correlates of ever having had a Papanicolaou (Pap) test among women who recently delivered a live infant and who resided near the US-Mexico border. Methods This cross-sectional study included women who delivered a live infant in Matamoros, Mexico (n = 488) and Cameron County, Texas (n = 453). Women were interviewed in the hospital before discharge between August 21 and November 9, 2005. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the odds of ever having had a Pap test. Results Significantly fewer Matamoros women (62.1%) than Cameron County women (95.7%) reported ever having had a Pap test. Only 12% of Matamoros women said they received their most recent Pap test during prenatal care, compared with nearly 75% of Cameron County women. After adjusting for potential confounders, the odds of ever having had a Pap test were 7.41 times greater in Cameron County than in Matamoros (95% confidence interval, 4.07-13.48). Conclusion The Healthy Border 2010 goals are to cut cervical cancer mortality by 20% to 30% in the border region. The significant difference in Pap test prevalence among our survey respondents may reflect that routine prenatal Pap testing is more common in the United States than in Mexico. Because women who are receiving prenatal care have increased interaction with health care providers, Matamoros providers may need to be educated about the need to screen for cervical cancer during this time.

AB - Introduction The objective of this study was to examine correlates of ever having had a Papanicolaou (Pap) test among women who recently delivered a live infant and who resided near the US-Mexico border. Methods This cross-sectional study included women who delivered a live infant in Matamoros, Mexico (n = 488) and Cameron County, Texas (n = 453). Women were interviewed in the hospital before discharge between August 21 and November 9, 2005. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the odds of ever having had a Pap test. Results Significantly fewer Matamoros women (62.1%) than Cameron County women (95.7%) reported ever having had a Pap test. Only 12% of Matamoros women said they received their most recent Pap test during prenatal care, compared with nearly 75% of Cameron County women. After adjusting for potential confounders, the odds of ever having had a Pap test were 7.41 times greater in Cameron County than in Matamoros (95% confidence interval, 4.07-13.48). Conclusion The Healthy Border 2010 goals are to cut cervical cancer mortality by 20% to 30% in the border region. The significant difference in Pap test prevalence among our survey respondents may reflect that routine prenatal Pap testing is more common in the United States than in Mexico. Because women who are receiving prenatal care have increased interaction with health care providers, Matamoros providers may need to be educated about the need to screen for cervical cancer during this time.

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