Challenging Return to Play Decisions

Heat Stroke, Exertional Rhabdomyolysis, and Exertional Collapse Associated With Sickle Cell Trait

Chad Alan Asplund, Francis G. O’Connor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Sports medicine providers frequently return athletes to play after sports-related injuries and conditions. Many of these conditions have guidelines or medical evidence to guide the decision-making process. Occasionally, however, sports medicine providers are challenged with complex medical conditions for which there is little evidence-based guidance and physicians are instructed to individualize treatment; included in this group of conditions are exertional heat stroke (EHS), exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER), and exertional collapse associated with sickle cell trait (ECAST). Evidence Acquisition: The MEDLINE (2000-2015) database was searched using the following search terms: exertional heat stroke, exertional rhabdomyolysis, and exertional collapse associated with sickle cell trait. References from consensus statements, review articles, and book chapters were also utilized. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: These entities are unique in that they may cause organ system damage capable of leading to short- or long-term detriments to physical activity and may not lend to complete recovery, potentially putting the athlete at risk with premature return to play. Conclusion: With a better understanding of the pathophysiology of EHS, ER, and ECAST and the factors associated with recovery, better decisions regarding return to play may be made.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-125
Number of pages9
JournalSports Health
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

Heat Stroke
Sickle Cell Trait
Rhabdomyolysis
Sports Medicine
Athletes
Athletic Injuries
MEDLINE
Consensus
Decision Making
Databases
Guidelines
Exercise
Physicians
Return to Sport
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • heat illness
  • return to play
  • rhabdomyolysis
  • sickle cell trait

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Challenging Return to Play Decisions : Heat Stroke, Exertional Rhabdomyolysis, and Exertional Collapse Associated With Sickle Cell Trait. / Asplund, Chad Alan; O’Connor, Francis G.

In: Sports Health, Vol. 8, No. 2, 01.03.2016, p. 117-125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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